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Full English Transcript of Gavin's AMA on 8BTC, April 21st. (Part 2)

Part 1
Part 3
Raw transcript on Google Docs (English+Chinese): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1p3DWMfeGHBL6pk4Hu0efgQWGsUAdFNK6zLHubn5chJo/edit?usp=sharing
Translators/Organizers: emusher, kcbitcoin, nextblast, pangcong, Red Li, WangXiaoMeng. (Ranked in alphabetical order)
18. sina
Q: 1) Hello, what's a better strategy for bitcoin holders if it hard forks at 75%? Is it worth holding of the coins in the minority chain? Or better selling them? Will the value of coins in the majority chain be weakened or reinforced? Thank you
A: 1) BIP109 does not hard fork at 75%, it hard forks 28 days after 75% has been reached-- so when the hard fork happens, there should be almost zero hash power on the minority chain. So there will not be a minority chain.
If I am wrong and blocks are created on the minority chain, people plan to get enough hash power to replace those blocks with empty blocks, so it is impossible to make any transactions on the minority chain.
Q: 2) if Bitcoin split into two chains, will it cause panic in the market, then the overall market capitalization fell?
A: 2) Bitcoin split into two chains accidentally in March of 2013, and there was panic selling -- the price dropped from $48 to $37 within a few hours. But the mining pools very quickly agreed on which branch of the chain they would support, the problem was resolved within a day, and a week later the price was over $60.
That shows the strength of consensus and incentives-- the mining pools did what was best for Bitcoin because that is what is best for themselves in the long term.
Q: 3) Now it requres 60-70G space for a full node wallet, also it takes severals days for synchronization. Technically, Is it possible in the future that a full node wallet only cost a little space and can be quickly synchronized? (Do not use light wallets and other third party wallets)
A: 3) You can run a pruned node that does not store the full block chain today (I’m running six right now on inexpensive servers around the world to test some new code).
It is technically possible to get fast synchronization without giving up any trust, but it would require miners do more work (they would have to compute and store and validate an “unspent transaction output committment hash” in the block chain). There are also schemes that would give you fast synchronization at a lightweight-wallet level of trust, but worked towards no trust if you were connected to the network for long enough.
Some developers say that you are not really using Bitcoin unless you run a full node, but that is wrong. Bitcoin was designed so that you can make the choice of speed and convenience versus trust. You give up very, very little trust if you run a lightweight wallet that supports multisignature transactions, and I think that is what most people should be running.
Q: 4) What do you think about Ethereum? Can Bitcoin achieve all the same functions claimed by Ethernet? Thank you
A: 4) I think most of the interesting things you can do with Ethereum you can also do with multi-signature Bitcoin transactions. I haven’t seen a really great use of Ethereum yet, and I think there will be a big problem with Ethereum smart contracts that are designed to steal people’s money, because very few people will have the skill necessary to tell if a complicated smart contract is correct.
I’m watching the rootstock.io project, which brings Ethereum contracts to Bitcoin.
Q: 5) Is it possible that Nakamoto may still participate in the development of Bitcoin by a pseudonym? What is the last time he contact you? Will he be back?
A: 5) Yes, it is possible. I tell reporters who ask me about Satoshi:
The idea of Bitcoin is important; who invented it is an interesting mystery, but I think it should remain a mystery until whoever invented it decides to step forward. We should respect Satoshi's privacy.
Q: 6) Now some government can prevent people from accessing foreign information using technical method(like the Great Firewall), people need to get across the wall first if they want to know information abroad. So technically speaking, is it possible that the government could block and damage the usage of bitcoin? If it is, is there any method to get across the wall?
A: 6) If a government controls network access into and out of their country (like the Great Firewall), they could easily block connections to and from today’s Bitcoin peer-to-peer network. Connections are not encrypted in any way, and most connect to port 8333, which would be easy to block.
However, blocking connections inside the country would be much harder. And it only takes one encrypted or satellite or microwave or laser connection that bypasses the firewall to get around the blockage and get blocks and transactions flowing across the border again.
I think governments that decide they don’t like Bitcoin are more likely to pass laws that make it a crime to use a currency other than the official government currency to pay for things.
Q: 7) You insist on hard fork at 75%, while Chinse Mining Pools insist at 90%. So it may be easier to get support from China If Classic changes to 90%. Have you ever considered to communicate with Chinese mine pool( such as convening a meeting) to reduce differences?
A: 7) Yes, I was in Beijing a few weeks ago to better understand what some of the Chinese mining pools are thinking. It was a productive meeting, and I look forward to communicating more with them soon.
Q: 8) How will halving and block size increasing impact the bitcoin price in your opnion? Thanks.
A: 8) The price, today, is a reflection of confidence. If people think Bitcoin will be valuable in the future, they are willing to buy it and hold it.
Everybody knows the halving will happen, so, theoretically, that should not affect today’s price.
I believe that increasing the block size limit would be very good for the price, because Bitcoin is more valuable the more people who are able to use it.
Q: 9) Technically, bitcoin should also have drawbacks. Some disadvantages may be improved in the future , while some may be difficult to improve. What are those shortcomings for bitcoin to hard to improve in your opinon? Are you an optimist thinking that all technical shortcomings are temporary, and they will all likely to be improved in the future?
A: 9) Every successful technology is full of shortcomings. It is always easier to look backwards and see your mistakes. Smart engineers are very good at working around those shortcomings, and wise engineering managers know when to work around a shortcoming to remain compatible with the existing technology and when it makes sense to break compatibility because eliminating a shortcoming would have large benefits.
Q: 10) If there is a kind of altcoin in the future goes beyond Bitcoin, it must has the advantage Bitcoin can not have, right? Conversely, if Bitcoin itself evolves fast, improves and adds new features, it will be difficult to be surpassed and eliminated, right? What does Bitcoin scalability and evolution capability look like?
A: 10) People are funny -- I can imagine an altcoin that has no technology advantages over Bitcoin, but some people prefer it for some reason. I live in a town where a lot of people care a lot about the environment, and I could imagine them deciding to use a “GreenCoin” where all miners must be inspected regularly and must use only solar power.
I think many engineers tend to over-estimate the importance of new features, and under-estimate the importance of reliability, convenience and reputation.
Satoshi designed Bitcoin to be very scalable, and to be able to evolve. I think the best way for any technology to scale and evolve is competition -- make the technology open, and let companies or teams compete to build the most reliable, convienent and secure products. That looks like (and is!) a very messy, chaotic process, but it produces better results, faster, than a single person or team deciding on on approach to solving every problem.
Q: 11) If R3 succeeds, will it challenge bitcoin in transnational remittances?
A: 11) Maybe -- if banks involved in R3 could make it very convenient to get money into and out of their blockchain. They might not be able to do that because of regulations, though. But I don’t know much about the international remittance market and what regulations the banks will have to deal with.
Q: 12) Can blockchain only be secured by mining? Some private blockchain do not have mining property, are they really blockchain?
A: 12) Security is not “yes it is secure” or “no it is not secure.” Proof of work (mining) is the most secure way we know of to secure a blockchain, but there are less secure methods that can work if less security is OK. And less security is OK for some private blockchains because if somebody cheats, they can be taken to court and money can be recovered.
Q: 13) Will public chain, private chain and R3 chain coexist for a long time? Or only one chain survive finally? What is the relationship among Bitcoin block chain, private chains and R3 chain , complementary or competitive? Will Bitcoin block chain eventually win?
A: 13) My guess is all of the “blockchain for everything” excitement will die down in a year or two and a lot of people will be disappointed.
Then a few years later there will be blockchains for everything, running quietly inside stock markets and currency exchanges and lots of other places. Some of them will use the Bitcoin blockchain, some of them won’t, and nobody besides blockchain engineers will care much.
Throughout it all, I think it is most likely Bitcoin continues to grow, hopefully with less drama as it gets bigger and more mature.
Q: 14) Some people think that it is difficult for the outside world to understand the technical details if lightning network is controlled by blockstream or another company, resulting in technological centralization, what’s your opinion?
A: 14) I don’t worry about that, the lightning protocol is being designed in the open as an open standard. It is complicated, but not so complicated only one person or company can understand it.
Q: 15) What is the procedure Bitcoin Core modify the rules? Take the 2M hard fork proposal as an example, I saw there are concerns that if one of the five core developers who have write access reject the proposal will be rejected. So If happens, does that mean the launch hard ford in July will be abandoned? What is percentage of agreement in Core developers to write code for such a major bifurcation matter like 2M hard fork? Are there any specific standards? Or the lead developer has the final decision?
A: 15) That is a good question for the current active Core developers. When I was the lead developer, I would make a final decision if a decision needed to be made.
19. JR13
Q: What do you think about the future of increasing bitcoin block size limit?
A: It will happen sooner or later -- almost everybody agrees it must happen. I am still working to make it happen sooner, because the longer it takes, the worse for Bitcoin.
20. vatten
Q: What decision making process you think should be used for future bitcoin development?
A: For example, WuJiHan's proposition of service providers and mining pools collecting individual mineuser opinion. Or, a non-profit making standard making committee like IEEE, consists of people with enough expertise in bitcoin and economy, finance?
I think we should look at how development of other very successful technologies works (like email or the http protocol). I am not an expert, but open standards and open processes for participating in creating standards that are either adopted by the market or not (like the IETF process) seem to work the best.
21. kcb
Q: From my experience on Reddit, people now start to understand that evil is not Blockstream/Core's intention. They simply have a very different vision on how Bitcoin network should be running and on how future development should be heading. They do whatever they can to protect their vision, even dirty tricks, because they feel they are bringing justice.
Similarly, in Chinese community, we do see the same situation. Many Chinese Bitcoiners that showed strong enthusiasm in the past differ with each other. This even happens among my own real-life friends.
My question is: How can we separate these two groups of people who have widely divergent visions? Bitcoin cannot proceed when carrying two totally different visions.
A: I don’t know! It is always best if everybody is free to work on their own vision, but for some reason some people seem to think that the block size limit will prevent big companies from taking over Bitcoin.
I think all they will accomplish is making the technology much more complicated. And big companies are much better able to deal with and control highly complicated technologies.
22. XRP
Q: Please share your comments on ripple, Mr. Guru.
A: I haven’t paid very much attention to Ripple- the last time I looked at it was probably two years ago. Back then I thought they would have trouble with governments wanting to regulate their gateway nodes as money transmitters, but I haven’t even taken the time to see if I was right about that.
23.Lory
Q: Hi Gavin, I think you had a disagreement with the Nakamoto roadmap in Bitcoin design. Can you explain why? Thank you.
A: I assume you mean the part where Satoshi says he doesn’t think a second implementation will ever be a good idea.
I just think Satoshi was wrong about that-- if you look at very successful protocols, they all have multiple compatible implementations. We understand a lot more about what it takes to be completely compatible and have much better tools to ensure compatibility. And the fact that there now are multiple compatible implementations working on the network (btcd being probably the best example) shows both that it is possible and that the other implementations are not a menace to the network.
24. HuoDongFaBu
Q: 1) For the dispute between Core and Classic, can we refer to the theory of “Common-pool resources” (Commons) in the Western cultural tradition to understand and grasp the public and neutral property of bitcoin so at to strive for a solution which can balance interests of all parties?
A: 1) Maybe. The blockchain could be considered a Commons today-- a common, limited resource. But if control of the block size limit was given to miners, then I don’t think it fits the definition any more, because miners would have the freedom to restrict its use however they saw fit, on a block-by-block basis. That is just a simple, pure market, with transaction creators on one side and miners on the other.
Q: 2) For the application requring "bitcoin multi-signature script", can you recommend any programming language, libraries or tools?
A: 2) BitPay has some good tools: https://github.com/bitpay/bitcore I haven’t worked on any multisignature applications since writing the low-level protocol code-- there are probably other great libraries and tools that I just don’t know about.
25. zhuoji
Q: Hello Gavin, are you now still developing Classic? Will Classic proceed? Would you give up Classic and return to Core?
A: Yes, yes, and there is no “return to” -- I plan on contributing to lots of projects.
26. jieke
Q: 1) If there are one million entrepreneurs who require fund and asset securitization via block chain technology, is it possible?
A: 1) If there are ten million investors willing to fund those entrepreneurs, sure it is possible. The technology won’t be a problem, one million is not a large number for today’s computers.
Q: 2) Why can we trust Bitcoin and what are the advantages of bitcoin in online payment and settlement? Its commission fee now is not as cheap as before, besides, the time for one confirm is not fast enough. Your opinions on pros and cons of Mining and PoW?
A: 2) For people in places with good-enough banking systems like the United States or China, purchasing things inside their own country, bitcoin does not have much of an advantage over existing payment systems. But if you are buying something from somebody in another country, or you live in a place where there are no good payment systems, Bitcoin works very well.
Proof of work and mining is the most fair, decentralized way to distribute new coins. They are also the best way of securing the network that we know of so far. Perhaps in 30 years when essentially all of the new coins have been mined and computer scientists have thoroughly studied other ways of securing the network it might make sense for Bitcoin to start to switch to something other than mining and proof-of-work to secure the network.
Q: 3) How likely the possibility of replacing the existing legal currency with virtual currency?
A: 3) Very unlikely in a large country. I can imagine a small country that uses a larger country’s currency deciding to switch to a crypto currency, though.
27. IMJENNIM
Q: 1) You have always insist on larger block. Some people share the same view, they just want to increase the block size, regardless of network bandwidth restrictions in China and other developing countries. How do you see this criticism?
A: 1) Most people are using Bitcoin over very limited bandwidth connections-- most people use lightweight wallets.
If you run a business that needs a fast connection to the Internet, then it is not expensive to rent a server in a data center that has very good bandwidth. Even inexpensive servers have plenty of bandwidth and CPU power to keep up with much higher transaction volume.
If you insist on running a full node from your home, average connection speed in China today is 3.7 megabits per second, which is almost 1,000 transactions per second. Latency through the Great Firewall is a bigger issue right now, but there are several software solutions to that problem that people (including myself) are working on right now.
Q: 2) In addition, I'm curious what is your opinion on the current Bitcoin Core team? There is no doubt? If so, why not act as a Core developer contributing code in Bitcoin Core to solve these problems?
A: 2) I like most of the people on the current Bitcoin Core team, they are great. But there are a couple of people on that team I don’t want to work with, so I have decided to limit the amount of time I spend with that project.
28.ShaSiKaEr
Q: 1) Hello Gavin, I would like to ask you how long since your last contribution in Bitcoin Core or others related? Expect the big influence as one of the earliest contributors, do not you think you ought to talk about the code, mostly for the coutribution of development of Bitcoin?
A from pangcong: 1)The last commit in bitcoin core made by Gavin is on September 30, 2015, after that Gavin was busy with bitcoin XT and bicoin classic. His actual development in bitcoin has never stopped, these records are very clear on github, if you want to ask questions which are obvious, please investigate first.
A from Gavin: 1) Also: I submitted some patches to Bitcoin Core a few days ago.
Q: 2) Also, you were a neutral software engineer before, seriously committed to improving the bitcoin. But now you're playing political means to enhance your impact on the future of Bitcoin, how do you respond with it?
A from KuHaiBian: 2) Now the biggest problem in Bitcoin is not block size limit, but that there is only one development team, it is as dangerous as the situation that there is only one mining pool mining bitcoin. This is the biggest problem Gavin is trying to solve.
A from Gavin: 2) I just give my honest opinion, and try to do what I can to make Bitcoin more successful.
29.Xseraph2
Q: There is no systematic process for Bitcoin upgrades. Is there any regulation/restriction on the power of Core devs? How do we balance the conflict between the centrilized power of the devs with interest of the community consensus? Do you think Bitcoin need to learn from R3 chains or distributed ledger systems? I.e. setting up regulations to constrain the power of the devs, so that only devs with “restricted access” can contribute, not everyone.
A: Competition is the best solution. If the Core team does not make their customers happy, then they will be replaced. It might take a year or more for another team to get the reputation for high-quality code that the Core team has acquired over the years.
30. ZhongBenCong
Q: In 2016, you propose to increase block size limit to 8M, then doubled every two years. Is it still the most promising expansion plan in your opinion now? If it is, do you think it possible that the block size reach 8GB in 2036, particularly given the network speed and bandwith in developing countries.
A: I think it would be best to eliminate the block size limit entirely, and let the miners decide if they should accept or reject blocks. The miners want Bitcoin to succeed, and will not choose a size so large the network cannot handle it.
I don’t know if people would agree to eliminate the limit, though. A dynamic limit that grows, but prevents an extremely large ‘attack block’ would also be a good solution.
The growing-8MB idea came from the idea that it should be possible for somebody on a home Internet connection to continue to validate every single transaction. However, more research showed that the bottleneck is not the connection from the Internet to our homes (even in China there is plenty of bandwidth there) but connections across international borders. In particular, the Great Firewall can sometimes greatly restrict bandwidth to and from China.
31. FengFengZhongXuYaoNi
Q: Gavin, hello! What is the reason do you think the community rejected Bitcoin XT?
A: It was a mistake to try to make more changes than just simply increasing the block size limit.
32. ShaSiBiEr
Q: Now the problem of block size limit is not so serious as before when Bitoin was attacked, and the Segwit has been deployed, so what is the controversy? Why have to argue to the bitter end, must we argue until bitcoin die? Gavin, we all know your contribution to Bitcoin. But in 2015, when you said in bitcoin software development, we need a "dictator" to resolve the dispute. I think you want to be this dictator. http://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2015-June/008810.html
A: Must we argue until bitcoin die: I think is is in the nature of people to argue, so I think we will be arguing about lots of things until either we die or Bitcoin dies. I think in a few years we will look back and wonder why there was so much arguing, but I also think some good things have come from all of the argument.
33. HuoDongFaBu
Q: 1) What do you think about Ethereum? Can smart contract run based on Bitcoin?
A: 1) (This question is repeated. Please see Q18-4)
Q: 2) What are the problems Miners may have to face after halving in July? Thanks!
A: 2) There is a small risk that the halving will make a good fraction of the miners stop mining, because they will get about half of the bitcoins they got before the halving. And that might mean blocks take longer to create, which means less space for transactions, which might mean people get frustrated and leave Bitcoin. Which could drop the price even more, causing more miners to stop mining, more frustration, and so on.
Miners tell me they have already planned ahead for the halving and this will not happen, which is why I think it is a small risk and I don’t think the halving will be a big problem for most miners.
Q: 3) Where can we get the whole code and code review of bitcoin?
A: 3)
Bitcoin Core is at: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin
Bitcoin Classic: https://github.com/bitcoinclassic/bitcoinclassic
btcd: https://github.com/btcsuite/btcd
bitcore: https://github.com/bitpay/bitcore
submitted by kcbitcoin to btc [link] [comments]

In honor of Talladega, here is a list of 98 FACTS ABOUT DOGECOIN AND DOGECOIN FACTS. Enjoy!

Hello, everyone!
In honor of the Talladega race, here is a list of 98 facts relating to Dogecoin and other Dogecoin-related facts, however tenuously. ;) This list isn't an official fact sheet, nor is it particularly authoritative, but hopefully you'll learn something interesting.
I tried to offer a mix of obvious and esoteric information.
  1. Josh Wise is the underdog(e) racer driving the Dogecoin-sponsored car in the Talladega NASCAR race.
  2. The number 98 comes from the number of Josh Wise's race car. You'll often see tips, etc. with 98 in them on the dogecoin subreddit.
  3. Other funny tip amounts include 4.20 and 777.
  4. NASCAR is an acronym meaning National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, referring to the stock cars that are souped-up from “normal” vehicles.
  5. NASCAR's roots are in bootlegging, where people drove illegal booze around and avoided cops with fast cars during the Prohibition.
  6. Doge- has become a useful prefix. A well-known example is the Dogecar.
  7. The Dogecar in question is a Ford Fusion.
  8. “Talladega” refers to the name of the racing track, the Talladega Superspeedway. The track was originally known as the Alabama International Motor Speedway, which is not nearly as catchy as 'Dega.
  9. The actual name of the race that Josh Wise is racing in is the Sprint Cup, during Aaron's 499.
  10. The Dogecoin “mascot” is a Shiba Inu, a Japanese dog breed whose name is sometimes translated as “Small Brushwood Dog.”
  11. People in the Dogecoin community are known as “shibes,” the nickname of the Shiba Inu.
  12. Sometimes “Shibes” is capitalized, just as “dogecoin” can be written in lowercase.
  13. The palindrome of Dogecar is Racegod.
  14. “To the moon!” is a rallying cry in both the Dogecoin and Bitcoin communities. It can refer to several things: the skyrocketing price, the adoption of the currency, or both.
  15. Dogecoin is based on a meme in which a Shiba Inu named Kabosu looks quizzical and uses strange grammar to remark on things.
  16. In fact, there are rules for Doge grammar.
  17. A mainstay of Doge grammar includes the use of “wow” at the end of statements.
  18. The Dogecoin font of choice is Comic Sans, released in 1994 with Microsoft products.
  19. Comic Sans, a much maligned font, was redesigned recently as Comic Neue. Classy!
  20. Dogecoin's code is derived from Litecoin, which is a cryptocurrency that developed after Bitcoin.
  21. Some of Dogecoin's biggest fund-raising efforts have included sending the Jamaican Bobsled Team to the 2014 Winter Olympics, building wells in Africa, and supporting victims of natural disasters. Plus the Dogecar!
  22. A Dogecoin ATM was demoed at Coinfest in early 2014.
  23. In Tijuana, Mexico, there are two Bitcoin-based ATMs that support Dogecoin.
  24. A house was recently put up for sale with the price of 100 million Dogecoins.
  25. A key difference between Dogecoin and Bitcoin is that Dogecoins are less rare, with 5.2 billion coins released into the economy every year.
  26. There are a handful of Dogecoin-friendly restaurants that accept Dogecoins as payment for food. One of the most well-known is the Iron Rail Diner.
  27. The Iron Rail Diner offers a “To the Moon” Sundae.
  28. If you'd rather buy food online, Dogecoin marketplaces have sprung up to allow shibes to grocery shop in their favorite cryptocurrency.
  29. The dogecoin subreddit lists a ton of service providers and shops that allow Dogecoin purchases, and there are other directories that can help you lighten your Dogewallet.
  30. Three foods available for purchase on ShopDoge are two flavors of Doritos and a pack of Mountain Dew.
  31. The stereotype does stand to some scrutiny: recent demographic surveys have skewed towards young, tech-savvy males.
  32. In fact, two recent surveys have shown female participation within the Dogecoin community at less than 15%--and one showed the level to be less than 10%.
  33. Mountain Dew is generally shown on labels as Mtn Dew. No period after Mtn, much like there being no period after the Dr. in Doctor Pepper.
  34. The no-period thing wouldn't be that unusual to someone familiar with British English: in many situations, the period is omitted after the title.
  35. The Tex-Mex fast food chain Taco Bell has exclusive rights to Mountain Dew Baja Blast.
  36. Tipping is a huge deal in the Dogecoin community.
  37. Although dogecoin is obviously very welcoming towards Dogecoin tips, other subreddits are less excited about them.
  38. “Tip” as a word isn't all that old. It originated in the 1700s and was originally a slang term.
  39. Tipping started in England when guests would offer “vails” for overnight accommodations.
  40. The word “gratuity” is much older, though the word in English has a much more official feel than the tipping found in the Dogecoin community.
  41. Tipping is a common practice in the U.S., but it's not an expectation around the world.
  42. The practice of tipping waitstaff in the States derives the fact that waiters and waitresses earn a much lower wage in order to offset food costs.
  43. In Japan, it's weird to tip people.
  44. Tips in USD are considered taxable income by the IRS, the Internal Revenue Service.
  45. The drinking water campaign in Kenya was funded partially by a 14 million-doge tip through Twitter, so-called the “most valuable tweet in history.”
  46. Dogecoin can be bought, acquired through tips, or acquired through faucets.
  47. Faucets are sites that offer a slow leak of cryptocurrency to users who enter their wallet address. Although the faucets offer free coins, the amounts are generally very small.
  48. A common occurrence in the Dogecoin community is the giveaway, a spontaneous tipping event with rules and parameters—even if the rules are that everyone who comments gets some Dogecoin!
  49. Although there are many shibes who start out in Dogecoin via mining, many others are lured in by the giveaways and the free Dogecoins that dogecoin hoists upon newcomers.
  50. The first Dogecoin conference happened in May 2014 in San Francisco. It was appropriately called DOGECON SF.
  51. Dogecoin started as a joke, but it soon became serious business.
  52. Another thing that started as a joke includes the game Goat Simulator, a ridiculously game in which the player causes goat mayhem.
  53. Testing new ideas as “jokes” can be a good way for businesses to get a sense of what their consumers actually want.
  54. One big example is ThinkGeek's Tauntaun sleeping bag, a joke that was so awesome that it had to eventually come true.
  55. You can buy legal services through Dogecoin.
  56. You can pay for an obstacle run through Dogecoins.
  57. There is such as a thing as caffeinated peanut butter, and it's available for purchase via Dogecoin.
  58. Master Gardeners—or at least one in Wisconsin—support Dogecoin!
  59. Master Gardeners are those individuals who have gotten intensive training through the American Horticulture Society.
  60. You can relax at a spa using Dogecoin.
  61. You can become a Korean martial arts master via Dogecoin.
  62. There are numerous ways to gamble your Dogecoin.
  63. Be careful, though: depending on where you live, online gambling may be illegal regards of currency.
  64. Actually, the laws regarding cryptocurrency and gambling are a bit nebulous.
  65. Online poker sites began to disallow U.S. Players from gambling their USD on a Black Friday.
  66. Black Friday is the day when profits go “in the black” (to the moon!) in time for the upcoming Christmas and holiday shopping season. It's a U.S. holiday of sorts after Thanksgiving in November.
  67. DogeMusic brings busker tips from the real world into Dogecoin tipping online. Much generous.
  68. Tipping in Dogecoin can be a type of crowdfunding, a pooling together of money for a cause that's rife around the Web of 2014 on sites such as Kickstarter, Kiva, and Indiegogo. In fact, these sites could one day accept Dogecoin tips!
  69. A handful of nonprofits accept Dogecoin, a few of which include Shelter Card, League Against Aids, Wags & Whiskers, and Ghana Medical Help.
  70. You can get a six-pack through Dogecoin. Sort of.
  71. You can surf in London through Dogecoin.
  72. May 4th is Buy Something with Doge Day, an effort to stimulate the burgeoning Dogecoin economy.
  73. May 4th is also Star Wars Day, an unofficial celebration that was given the nod by LucasArts. May the Fourth be with you!
  74. Dogecoin was introduced to the world on December 8th, 2013.
  75. If Dogecoin were a person, it would be a wobbly toddler. At the age of four months, toddlers' eyes have generally sharpened to 20/40 vision.
  76. If Dogecoin were a puppy, its vision wouldn't be in black and white, like some people believe. Instead, it would be saturated in yellows and blues!
  77. Dogecoin shares a birthday with Nicki Minaj, Mary Queen of Scots, Eli Whitney, and Ann Coulter.
  78. Another famous birthday twin includes Sinead O'Connor, who was sent to an asylum for shoplifting when she was a teenager.
  79. The day after Dogecoin's inception, an article reported that over 500 were mining the new cryptocurrency. That number has increased tremendously since then.
  80. One famous Dogecoin supporter is the man behind Goatse.cx.
  81. Goatse.cx is a shock site from the Internet days of yore featuring, well... Google it.
  82. The owner of the .cx domain, Christmas Island, is the one who stopped the scourge of Goatse.
  83. Before the advent of novelty domains such as .ninja or .bar, domain names were based on actual locales.
  84. Colombia, owner of all .co domains, gets revenue from sites with a .co suffix.
  85. One of the top-rated posts on dogecoin shows a photo of the Jamaican bobsled team in the Olympic parade.
  86. Another post shows 50,000 Dogecoin-worth of pizza being delivered to a homeless shelter.
  87. Dogecoin is very much focused on philanthropic efforts. Studies show that doing good makes you feel good, which has likely contributed to the tipping culture on Dogecoin.
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  98. This list is 1,901 words long. Whew!
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[Table] IAmA: We sell cars at CarMax, ask us anything

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Date: 2014-05-21
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Questions Answers
What would you suggest to a mid-20's person who still has their little student car (like a honda civic that'll never die) that wants to upgrade just a bit? Lots of factors for this question, starting with budget. If you want to trade in your car and have a few grand to put down, that would be an awesome downpayment on a ~$20k car. If you're wanting to use that amount to just straight up buy a car... Keep yours til it dies.
Personally, my car still runs just fine and there's no real issues, it's just a 1996 model and the paint's coming off the hood. I have a few thousand I could potentially spend plus whatever I get from my car trade in (I believe the Kelly Bluebook value is around $2800). What kind of cars should I be looking at to make a slight upgrade? But, in the ~20ish range, as previously mentioned I really like the Nissan Maxima. If you like American made the new Ford Fusion is very nice, especially in the titanium trim package. Hell, the higher trim package Honda Accords are very nice too. Lots of options in that range, but I'd have to know a lot more about you, your financial situation, and what you want to give you a good, customer focused recommendation
Do your salesmen smell like they have been marinating their forearms at the perfume counter at Bloomingdales for a month? Personally, all of us contributing don't usually wear cologne to work. We do have one consultant that will about make you pass out every time they walk past with the overpowering smell.
Are they wearing suits like someone's Aunt just died? No suits at Carmax, thank god. Polo and khakis/shorts for most of us. It would suck working summer in a suit.
On average, is the average salesman's hair oiled more or less than the average block-piston of one of your cars? Again, for the most part no products for us answering. But again, there are culprits, and it's not a good look.
When your salesmen make your customers grab their socks on a purchase, is it just a little bump, or do they bang the customers heads against the showroom ceiling until there are head-prints? As much as I sometimes wish that was the case, we actually try are absolute hardest NOT to screw people. CarMax, as pertaining to both consultants and as a company, makes very little off each car sale. We just make up for it in volume. Also, commission isn't based on a % of the vehicle, so I don't care if you buy a $7k or $70k car - I'm making the same amount. Tl;dr light tap at worst, usually just a longing gaze.
Regarding the no-haggle pricing. If there is a car I want to buy from my local Carmax for almost $12,000, and KBB says a fair value of the car is only $9500, does that mean I can just offer you guys $9500 and you'll accept it or does it mean that you'll only accept the $12,000 listed price? It will be $12,000. KBB is a great place to start, but is by no means accurate all the time on car values. Same with when people say their trade in is worth X amount according to KBB. Honestly, probably 75% of the time people don't enter their info into KBB accurately, which exacerbates the problem. Don't even get me started on NADA.
I would venture that KBB is much more 'accurate' in terms of the actual value of the car than the dealer mark up price. I would venture that KBB data can be months out of date, doesnt take into account conditions like season/location that can have a large impact on value, can be affected by things like a dealer offering more for a car because it was traded in (they get their data from dealers), and when it comes down to it, KBB is an estimation of what you might get for your car. We are giving you a written offer saying we'll hand you a bank draft for that amount, today.
The most reliable, sporty car that your money is worth? Reliable and still being sporty in what price range? I'm gonna say probably something like a Nissan Maxima for the average person. The SV trim package had a ton of options (leather, heated seats, back up camera, Bluetooth, satellite radio, sunroof, navigation, Bose speakers), and the v6 puts out 290hp. Pretty quick, and the paddle shifters are fun.
I have to disagree. After having worked on 05-06 Maximas that had a transmission made by, what I assume, was the lowest bidding glass manufacturing company in North Korea I just can never recommend a Maxima to anybody. And they make them in my home town too :( Let me rephrase: newer Maximas. Also they do have CVTs (continuously variable transmission), which requires trans fluid changes about every 30k miles as opposed to the 80-90k recommended for most vehicles.
"Regular" Dealerships that are near CarMax generally will say, "We have already lowered our prices to compete with CarMax, we cannot lower them anymore." What is your take on that? My take is that we sold 522,950 cars last year, and regular dealers can't compete with us. We have the market cornered on well maintained, newer, low mileage used cars.
That being said you can get good deals on used cars that are outside of what Carmax sells (older than 2003 or over 130k miles). I bought mine from a small mom and pop type place and got a great deal, just have to know what you're looking fohow to bargain. The larger dealers that sell used cars though don't stand a chance.
I was told that you guys make zero bonus on selling cars. You just have to meet some monthly quota. How true is that? Does the quota ever go up or down? Seriously, no bonuses? Nope, no quota. We all work on 100% commission, we don't get hourly or a salary. We make a flat commission per vehicle, doesn't matter what we sell. I really like that as a sales person, so that when I make a recommendation it's something I feel is beneficial to the customer, not just trying to up sell for the paycheck. We can make a higher (flat) commission if we maintain high selling numbers for several months at a time, but you have to maintain that. Pretty much the harder you work the more you make.
Isn't the carmax model to not be like regular dealers? We aren't like other dealers! I wouldn't say that's our entire business model, although we definitely do put the customer first and try and make the car buying experience as simple as possible so.. maybe it is haha.
What would you say is the ratio of people who look online and pick what they want and buy that vs people that come to the lot? I would say about 70% of my customers have at least done some kind of research online before they step foot in the store. And then of course we've got people that come in and just want to walk the lot/kick tires, since we don't force you to be accompanied by a sales consultant at all times like most dealers. Also all of our vehicles are unlocked so you can get in them and check em out without us there, which most people seem to love.
Do all the cars have a sticker price? Yes, all vehicles have the year, make, model, mileage, features, and price clearly printed on the sticker.
Is there any way to get below sticker? No way to get below sticker unless you work here ;)
Are you familiar with Doug DeMuro's reviews of CarMax's warranty program on Jalopnik? Is so, what are your thoughts on his reviews? Do you find the warranty to be a good value? Great question. I hadn't heard of his reviews until just now actually and went and read them.
In my opinion, maxcare is the best extended service plan in the business, period. It covers more, costs less, and is extremely up front about what is and is not covered. Personally I sell maxcare at about an 80% clip, but even company average is over 60%. You'd be hard pressed to find people buying another extended service plan at that frequency. When my next vehicle comes from Carmax, I will definitely be purchasing it.
My concern is the constant fight with the dealer about what is a "wearable part". That makes me never want to buy into a warranty. What's the point if you aren't going to fix it? Maxcare is very clear cut on what it does and does not cover. As in, lists exactly what it doesn't cover, and anything not listed will be covered, period. It's extremely easy to understand
True that when you buy a car to be re-sold, one of the first things you do is put new tires on it and sell the old on the used-tire market, even if they're almost new? Good question, definitely not true. The state requirement for tread depth varies; in our state it is 2/32nds of an inch. CarMax doubles that to 4, and it is RARE to see tires that worn on cars we plan to retail. We will only replace tires if it doesn't meet standards; I've sold a car that's tread was right at 6/32nds before.
Do all CarMax's have ridiculous quantities of Porsche Panameras or is it just my local one? Just the local one. We have a lot of... Fiestas? :/
Sounds like a festive work environment. But seriously, at least 15 Panameras on site. I'm gonna guess you either live in California or Florida
Any idea why there isn't a carmax store in New Jersey? No idea. But Carmax expands every year, maybe soon! Us worker bees aren't usually privy to that type of info until it's imminent.
Also would it be difficult to buy a car from you guys out of state and then register it here? (New Jersey) Not hard at all! You will simply pay your state sales tax at time of purchase, which may differ from the one you purchase it in.
Lastly, how is the extended warranty price determined? Our extended service plan, maxcare, is priced entirely by the vehicle it is covering. Simply put, a newer, lower mileage vehicle will be less expensive to cover than a comparable older one. Further the cost of fixing the vehicle is taken into account (BMW is more expensive to fix than a Honda), and what kind of reputation the vehicle has for needing repairs. The best deal is usually on Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Mazda, Kia, Hyundai. The absolute worst? SmartCar. We sell them for around 10k and the service plan is something like 5-6k, because they do not have a great rep and they're expensive to fix a lot of the time.
That what I was hoping for. You guys sell warranties for some silly silly cars. I'm going to take advantage of that when my lease is up. [edit: and by silly cars I mean things along the lines of BMW //M5 and Audi RS anything. ] Honestly, even on those cars I would take maxcare if I was the one buying it. I have owned an m3, and I have paid to fix it. Literally use the plan once or twice and it's already paid for itself. Good luck finding a car after the lease is up!
What car would you recommand as a pussy magnet? C63 AMG. Big fan. Link to www.carmax.com
I need something with AWD though. Currently I have a g35x. It fairs well. I got you. Porsche 911 turbo: Link to www.carmax.com
Or Audi S5: Link to www.carmax.com
It's kind of offensive that they had to stick the CarMax logo on the rear decklid. It's on every one of our vehicles. It's really easy to remove though!
What's your worst type of customer? From a fellow consultant: Typically, when that shiny, clean, 2011 Ford F250 Superduty pulls onto the lot we all cringe. Truck clients have gained a stigma for being the most unrealistic customer that steps foot into our dealerships. "I want a 2013 Silverado 1500 with no more than 20k miles for under $15000"... Yeah, so do we all. Take a hike champ.
Couple answers. First, people that come in having done (bad) research on what their car is worth, and blast me when they don't like the realistic value of what their car is worth. Again, NADA is the worst.
Next, people that come in really wanting to bargain and get offended when I tell them we have no haggle pricing - we advertise the heck out of it, you'd think they'd already know.
Finally, people that are extremely unrealistic about pricing. They want a car under 10,000 miles, newer than 2013, with leather and a sunroof, and it needs to be under $10,000. Sorry dude, we sell used cars not unicorns. Those are also the ones that will call back after the fact to tell me they found that at billy bobs used cars, only to later find out it has frame damage.
How would you recommend people keep from rolling debt from one car into the next? Would you say that the best option is too buy a car with cash in hand and drive it for as long as possible before trading it in? Pay it off before you sell it. Or at the very least, pay enough such that your car is worth more than the payoff. Rolling negative equity isn't the worst ever, but make sure whatever you roll it into will be something you want to keep long enough to pay off. And get GAP insurance for sure if you are rolling negative.
Okay. Just want to make sure that I am on the right track now. I rolled negative equity through multiple cars and ended up with a 35K brand new GTI (10K over sticker, dumb i know). Well I have paid off the car and the extra debt and now I have a 2012 GTI with a lil work into it. I assume the best thing to do at this point (financially) is drive it until the wheels fall off? Financially, yep. Definitely.
What demo are you currently driving? Demos are only for managers and sales consultants that are selling at the highest level/have been with the company a pretty long time. I'm not a new hire, but I definitely haven't been here long enough to qualify for a demo :/ My manager was rocking a Cadillac CTS4 earlier.
Sad...I was disappointed by the choice in demo of my recent CarMax sales guy...a Buick Enclave. Not that it's bad, but so many better choices. Yeah, enclaves are nice enough on the inside I guess, but definitely not what id pick. They do have price constraints on what they can demo though, so you won't see anyone working at Carmax demoing something insanely expensive haha.
Is there anything you can suggest doing last minute to a car before bringing it in to sell? Sure. I'm not an appraiser, we actually have a separate department for that, but I entepresent appraisals to customers so I'll give you what tips I can.
We tell customers that as long as there's no damage/nothing wrong that the appearance of the vehicle doesn't matter, and maybe sometimes it doesn't. But in my experience if you get all your crap out of the car and give it a wash, you might get a little extra (think hundreds, not thousands). You wouldn't belief the disgusting vehicles people bring in - it's always nice appraising something that doesn't look like a family of hoarders uses as their trash bin. Also, our appraisers will drive the vehicle a short distance to make sure the tranny/engine are ok, and putting them in a grossed out or bad mood from all your crap will not help your cause.
Tips on bargaining on a car? Absolutely! The best tip I have: don't bargain. Come to CarMax, we do no haggle pricing on vehicles so you always know what the lowest price is up front ;)
Edit: just to be clear, we just don't bargain. Most customers hate that part of car buying and never know if they could've gotten a better deal. Since we eliminate that and are extremely transparent in all of our associated car buying costs, customers can know exactly what they're getting for exactly how much up front
I never knew carmax had the no haggle policy. Next time I am looking for a car I will definitely check them out. I hate the negotiating part and if I can get the same deal or pay even a little bit more not to deal with it at carmax I would buy from you. Yep that's how it works! We have a gigantic sign inside that says "the way car buying should be," and it's true!
A few months ago I was looking to buy a car from Car Max "No haggle" the obviously let me walk because i wanted to talk it for lower. I ended up going to an official dealer and getting the same type of car 2 years newer and less miles for about 3k cheaper. Do you really think the "no haggle" thing is worth it? Unequivocally yes. We get a lot more customers than we lose off of no haggle pricing. And yeah, we won't ever haggle with you. If we haggle with one person, we're just lying to everyone else, and then what else would we lie about?
Thoughts on the 2013/2014 Kia Optimas? I'm thinking they're my best "next car" after having my '98 Toyota Tacoma for the past 12 years. (2nd owner). What are some best alternatives? I think the Optimas are AWESOME. Kia and Hyundai give you a lot of car for what you pay vs a lot of other brands. Satellite radio, bluetooth, and heated seats are very common options even on base models. Especially at carmax - hell, we had a 2013 with 9k miles, hybrid, good options, for 19k. Hell of a price. Equivalent to the Optima, check out the Hyundai Sonata (Kia and Hyundai are the same company). Other than that, you're probably looking at paying a little bit more for an Accord, Camry, or Maxima.
On a different tangent, maybe look at the Ford Fusion or Chevy Malibu. The newer American made cars are much nicer than people are giving them credit for, and because of the American auto industry's poor rep the past few years they are also selling cars at less than they probably could be. I would feel comfortable buying either vehicle.
How can your company sell a used 2010 Ford Ranger for $19,000 with say, 30k on the odometer, all the while knowing that the consumer can walk across the street and get a brand new Toyota Tacoma for $18,000. Do car companies realize this is frustrating for the consumer? Kind of hard to reply appropriately without actually seeing the comparison, but a quick search on the Toyota website and Carmax.com shows me that if you're getting a Tacoma for 18k, it is absolutely base model, 2 door, 2 wheel drive, and that Rangers in that price range tend to be crew cab 4wd. So that's an apples to oranges comparison.
But also, like I said, you can get good deals at other places sometimes, we aren't always the best. You also have to live with the fact that when buying new, you lose about 15% of what you just paid as soon as you drive off the lot.
How often are you the best? I don't know if I could give a really accurate percentage, but I would very confidently say more often than not. Personally I'm just not an advocate of buying new, and will always buy used (I thought this way before working with cars/at Carmax). As mentioned before you just lose too much after driving off the lot, and it's a lesser amount buying used. Plus you can get more car for the same amount of money. It's just a win-win.
What do you know about what they do when they buy a car? If something happens to a car that you sell does it come back? How often does that happen? So actually, one of the really awesome things CarMax does that I'm not aware of anyone else doing - you have 5 days to bring back the car for any reason whatsoever. Hell, you don't have to have a reason, bring it back within 5 days and you get all your moneydollars back. After that, we also give you a 30 day limited warranty which will cover anything wrong with it in that time period, and obviously if there's factory warranty or you purchased maxcare that goes into effect after. I've only probably had 3 returns in the past 3 years, and 2 of them were old people that their children forced them to stop driving haha.
Say I'm looking for a decently specific truck and having a hard time finding one. What options do I have in regards to finding one from you guys? Talk to your local sales consultant and tell them exactly what you want. Chances are we can find it for you; we have 42,000 vehicles in our inventory. If we don't have it currently we get new vehicles in daily, we can build a vehicle search and continually look until it's found. I just spent 2 months finding a guy an almost new SRT8 Challenger in Plum Crazy Purple. Was the only one in the country we had when it popped up, and we had it shipped up here. Depending where the one they find is, you may not even have to pay to transfer it!
What's your pick for a good entry-level luxury sedan, both used and new? Entry level? Probably something like a BMW 328 or Acura TSX. Next step up just go to the 335, or Mercedes C300. For even more affordable, the VW CC Lux is pretty nice
I have not had a great experience with TSX. I think Acura sacrifices a lot of quality for that particular model. Plus frequent brakes issues are apparently a known problem in recent years. The MDX and TL are different stories. Actually I'm glad you said this. I was thinking TL and typed TSX. Yeah, I'd also go with the TL.
We have the 04 TL. I hate the way the newer gen TLs look. What's your opinion on the 04-08 TL vs new gen TL looks? I like all of em :/ the newer ones are different but still really nice, and fun to drive.
Is there any interest in selling things that are not cars? Tanks, helicopters, warthogs, etc. Any interest personally? Sure why not. Sales is sales, doesn't really matter what it is. Now that you mention it.. I'll sell the hell out of airplanes or yachts, that sounds awesome! Tanks too.
Did you guys go out? Nooope. She was... how to put it delicately... Larger. And had a kid that was like 8. Easily one of the most awkward conversations I've ever had.
Can you guys leave us the f*ck alone when we go in there? You have the store designed to make it impossible for someone to just go in and browse. I ended up buying my car somewhere else because your salesman wouldn't let me just take 10 mins to look around. That's pretty weird. I mean yeah, we have the store set up such that you need to walk through it to get to the lot, but we let people browse all the time. The only reason we do that is so that everyone gets talked to so we can at least ask if they do want help. I can't tell you how many people will go hop the gate, and then come inside angry because nobody came outside to chase them down. But personally, and I can speak for all of us contributing - if a customer wants to browse, we'll definitely let them. We'll just check in every 10-15 mins to see if we can help out. Sorry you had that experience, but congrats on the new ride!
Glad you guys are here. Great ad pitch for you, and I learned about a possible way to get my next car. Looking for a fun SUV in the 35-45k range with low miles. I am currently looking at GC or 4Runner. Thoughts? Well... you're talking to a guy that drives a 4Runner, and I am hugely biased. So go buy a 4Runner.
Seriously though, 4Runners are AWESOME vehicles. They're pretty much indestructible, get fantastic MPG for a vehicle that size, are extremely off road capable even bare bones stock (you are getting 4wd, ARENT YOU?), and they have a party mode button. Whats that you ask? A "party mode" button you say? Yes dear friend, I said party mode button. The newer 4Runners have a button, clearly labled with PARTY MODE that turns on the amp/sub and makes your speakers sounds better. Total gimmick, and I love it.
In actual mechanical sense, Toyota knows how to make a truck/suv. They make great cars too, but especially trucks and SUVs. Anecdotal evidence: we appraised a 2007 Toyota Tacoma with 950,000 miles. ON THE ORIGINAL ENGINE. Yeah, apparently all this person did was drive, but seriously - almost a MILLION miles on one engine. If that isn't a testament to quality, I'm not sure what is.
If you have any other specific questions about 4Runners/Tacomas I'll be happy to answer!
950,000 miles on an 07?! WTF did he get for it? $0.99? We told them to take to it Toyota because that had to be some kind of record haha.
I think Toyota might use that person's story and car as a marketing ploy and perhaps give him a new Toyota for free. That's what we said, and I sincerely hope so!
What do you all like to do for your free time? In the state I live, I go hiking in the mountains and take pretty frequent beach trips. But I mean other than that, normal stuff I guess? Haha I play league of legends with buddies, and we go out together pretty frequently to toss a few back. Some days it's a necessity after certain interactions haha. After a good pay period we will go hard.
But the reality is that CarMax still needs to make a profit/commission for every car sale so with the "no haggle" the cars aren't really priced at the lowest possibility because CarMax still needs to make money which is fine but without the haggle how can a buyer really be getting the "BEST" deal? Best deal as compared to the competition. You aren't buying a car from a dealer at cost, no matter how good you are at haggling. Also, Carmax makes a smaller profit margin than most dealers, but we make up for it by selling a LOT of vehicles. Both as a company and as individual consultants, we make our money in volume of sales, not big margins on each sale.
Can I buy a car from you using Bitcoin? Oh man I hope so. Never heard that question. I'm not at work but I'll find out
I'm test driving what my become my first car purchase on Saturday. No CarMax near me, I'm afraid. The Carfax report indicates that this vehicle was involved in a minor accident some time ago, and (apparently) as a result, the dealer is offering it for $17k instead of the KBB value of ~$25k for the same car in pristine order. This dealer has a good reputation, but even so, what can I do to make sure that the damage has been properly repaired? If you have a mechanic friend I would take them along to look at the vehicle, or ask the dealer if you could take the vehicle to an independent mechanic for inspection. That sounds a little fishy to me.
Usually a price drop that drastic would indicate frame damage to me, aka damage to the skeleton of the vehicle, which will greatly impact the value of the car. Unfortunately, carfax doesnt report everything, and while autocheck (what we use, very similar) reports twice the incidents carfax does, its not foolproof either. Definitely take along someone that knows what they're looking at. If you don't know anyone, try and get under the car and look for spots along the frame lines that appear to have been welded. Don't forget to open up the hood and trunk and check those frame rails too.
Let's say I'm looking to sell/trade-in a 2001 Lexus IS 300 at the end of the year to get a new car. It looks great and runs fine, but the catalytic converter needs to be replaced. How much lower would the value of it drop? Or would you not even consider purchasing it? Would I be better off trying to sell it myself, selling it to Carmax, or trading it in with the dealer I'm buying the car from? Go get a quote from the dealer you want to buy a car from, then go to carmax and see what you get. If it's better, take it, if not, then go back to the dealer.
This is the first I've heard of CarMax. Is there a different process for selling to Canadians? Or are you even allowed to sell to your brothers north of the border? I am 100% sure you could come to the US and purchase a vehicle, although I'm not sure how sales tax/registering the vehicle would work. I was fairly certain we had some CarMax stores north of the border, but I may be mistaken on that one.
Plans for carmax Canada? Please? I thought we had CarMax in Ontario = maybe I'm wrong, I'm a pretty long ways from Canada so I may be ill informed
Is it true you get paid on fixed commission? Does this also mean you have a fixed gross margin? Yes we do get paid on a fixed commission. Lots of positives in that, for both the salesperson and the customer.
As far as I can tell, there isn't. Just dealerships using the Car Max as their name. Doh. Sorry guys. Hopefully soon!
Why buy an used car when i can lease new car + get a new one for free every few years? Because when you lease a car it's never really yours. You don't own that vehicle. That's like asking why buy a house when you can just rent the rest of your life? As someone with a paid off vehicle that doesn't have monthly car payments to deal with, it's a really nice feeling! And even better knowing that when I want something new, I have a few thousand of positive equity to work with.
People tell me that selling a car to Carmax is the easiest thing in the world since you guys literally buy anything and give pretty good money for it. What's the policy on cars with mechanical problems (in my case, coolant issues that I don't want to drop any more $$$ on getting it fixed)? We will buy literally any car. If it has mechanical problems, if you come in and we can identify it or you have documentation showing whats wrong, our buyers will look at the vehicle, assess what the price would be fully operational, and then subtract our cost of fixing it, pretty straightforward.
I recently had a 2003 Honda Odyssey appraised and apparently the drivers side door was not the original and we never had an accident. How do you guys find that out? For a door its pretty simple, they will have a VIN number matching the vehicle's VIN, and apparently your door didnt match. also, the appraiser will check for rough paint (evidence of recently painted, overspray) and things like that to tip them off
Just wondering, do you mind taking someone for a test drive, even if they no intent on buying the vehicle anytime soon? I am very curious about a certain car, but cannot afford it anytime soon... thanks... Nope not usually, unless the person is particularly strange or wastes a ton of time. Even if you're not planning to buy for awhile I'm usually very happy to help in any way I can.
Strangest customer interaction, GO. From a fellow consultant: we constantly deal with oddball situations. However, one that is fresh in my mind is a gentleman who claimed we had driven his car "too hard" on a test drive. In full biker gear he stormed back in the next day and made random threats at our staff... Fairly intense day.
For mine, I've worked at a couple different stores. The worst was definitely being on a test drive with someone that was currently on meth. Yep, that happened. Also, there was a time a (much older) woman waited an hour while i was with another customer so that she could ask me out.
Billy Bob's has terrible cars. Jimmy John's is where it's at. I heard their cars are freaky fast... Imsosorry.
I had a great experience when I sold my vehicle at CarMax, but it would've been even greater if my representative was an informed citizen of the internet. Glad to hear it! You might be surprised how many of us are. After all, when it's a slow day we spend lots of time sitting around if we aren't doing follow up haha. A lot of us spend that time on reddit.
Last updated: 2014-05-25 23:05 UTC
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[Table] IAmA: We are iFixit co-founder Kyle Wiens and cell phone unlocking crusader Sina Khanifar, two guys fighting for your right to unlock everything you own

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Date: 2013-03-22
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Is it possible for an 83 year old to have a well-reasoned attitude towards the internet, or are all people that old hopelessly analog and therefore irrelevant I would hope so! But I imagine it would take some time—there's a lot of context he's missing that we have, and vice versa. I'm sure that there's a lot that I could learn from Mr. Billington. Maybe I should drop by his library sometime and see if he'll show me around!
Why should I tailor my design to the .1% of the market who cares about repairing their design, instead of the 50% of the market who would rather have an extra 1mm shaved off the case, or who would rather save $.50 due to a more efficient factory assembly methodology? Just because the first owner doesn't fix it, doesn't mean no one will. Eventually, 100% of the products you design will fail. The battery will wear out or someone will drop it. The need for repair is just about as inevitable as taxes. Products that have long lives have much higher resale value. Toyota trucks sell for a significant premium over Ford trucks of the same year with the same mileage. And people care about how much they're going to be able to get for their used product a year down the line, even if they're not interested in ever fixing it themselves. Large purchasers are increasingly paying attention to design lifespan. I know purchasers at very large organizations that are horrified by the prospect of a glued in battery with a 2-3 year life. They have to get a better return on their investment than that.
Hey! I wrote a repair guide for a Fender guitar amp for you guys for my technical writing class at Cal Poly SLO! My question is what sort of compromise could you foresee that would both allow use consumers to do what we wish with our products, while still protecting the intellectual property of the numerous companies we purchase our products from? For those who are interested, here's their Fender repair manual. Great job!
The question is what intellectual property needs to be protected? There are already lots of laws that protect Fender from you starting a competitor and using their patented designs or trademarked logo and case styling.
In the case of electronics, all the design engineers I know tell me that by the time a product has shipped, they assume that it's obsolete. They know their competitors will be taking it apart and analyzing it.
Sharing information needed for repairs doesn't really make it any easier to clone a product. A number of manufacturers—Dell and HP, for example—provide service manuals on their website already. And iFixit's Apple service manuals didn't prevent (or factor in at all with) their lawsuit against Samsung.
My opinion is that the laws we have are substantially the result of a) unintended consequences of the fight against media piracy; b) Cell carriers using the law to enforce a monopoly; and c) a strategy of planned obsolescence.
Now that's it's illegal; what are the chances of getting caught? Is it easy for phone providers to track down an unlocked cell phone? Will they actively go after people? Or do you think it's going to be more like illegal torrenting where they'll go after the big fish (ie people marketing unlocking/jailbreaking services) and maybe cherry pick a few unlockers here and there to make an example out of them? The odds of them coming after you or me are very low. I'm not sure that they could detect remotely whether a phone has been unlocked—it would probably come down to how accurate their database is and whether there is data sharing between the carriers.
It's the folks making the unlocking software—like geohot and the iPhone dev team—as well as refurbishers and resellers. Companies like Recellular unlock millions of cell phones per year. If they can't do that, the used phone market will be significantly disrupted. It will become extremely expensive to buy unlocked phones, and your old locked phone won't be worth nearly as much.
It's crazy that intellectual property law is interfering with the free market of physical products like this. It's farcical. Imagine if Ford cut a deal with a toll road company and didn't allow you to drive your car on another company's roads!
We need to find ways of educating policy makers about the impact of applying policies designed to prevent piracy to physical hardware.
How do you think the rise of 3D printing is going to affect your iFixit business? Do you believe scanning the 3D models of little plastic pieces be subject to DMCA takedowns? And if so, would you consider addressing that on your fixthedmca.org site? I'm really excited about 3D printing. We haven't seen a ton of practical 3D printable repair parts, but that day is coming.
The legal issues around printing 3D parts are pretty different from the copyright concerns around unlocking (circumventing encryption) and access to service manuals and diagnostics. With printing objects, you run into problems with 3D patents and trademarks. If it's legal for a third party to make a replacement handle for your refrigerator, it should be legal for you to 3D print one. But that's by no means certain, and I think it's going to be a significant fight in the coming years.
There have already been some DMCA takedowns of 3D files, but IANAL and I couldn't say exactly what the implications are.
A major challenge for small companies like ours is uncertainty. Let's say I create a 3D file of my door handle, post it to iFixit, get sued by a major manufacturer, and my lawyers tell me I have a strong legal case for fair use. Going to trial could cost millions of dollars—money the manufacturer may be willing to spend, but that we wouldn't be able to afford.
This is a big reason why you don't see very many people standing up to the OEMs. It's also why it's critical that we financially support fantastic organizations like the EFF, Public Knowledge, Free Press, and others who are willing to fight long fights on behalf of us consumers. Free markets need clarity.
That said, iFixit is totally happy to host any 3D models of spare parts people want to throw up on our servers, as long as the files were independently created.
As a Cal Poly SLO Electrical Engineering student who built a 3d printer this summer, I support IFixit hosting models. Let's get started uploading some models, then!
Everything that you guys take apart and breakdown.. do you pay for those out-of-pocket, or are they given to you by the manufacturers? How do they feel about you doing that? Great question. We buy everything at retail, just like Consumer Reports. Since we're rating the repairability, it's important that we get the same hardware that you would buy at the store.
That gets a little expensive, particularly with out-of-contract cell phones (we'll be taking apart the Blackberry Z10 soon), but it's worth it. You can't tell how hard it'll be to repair something without taking it apart, and we've taken it on as our sworn duty to educate people before they find out the hard way.
We posted a tablet repairability matrix the other day.
Well, I feel like that is likely ALREADY the case with many cars. They all have lots and lots of chips in them. How many of those chips are we allowed to access, inspect, etc., without violating something like DMCA? It totally depends on whether they're encrypted.
Legally, can you modify the code on the chips?
Practically, will anyone do it?
Right now, we're focused on the first issue—guaranteeing your right to tinker. That's why we need to repeal Section 1201 of the DMCA.
But for repairs, the time to reverse engineer those chips is so significant that you would never be able to do so in the process of fixing a car. For many repairs, access to service documentation and diagnostics are critical. That's why Massachusetts just passed Right to Repair legislation requiring service information be made available. Independent auto mechanics were worried they wouldn't be able to stay in business.
I think we need Right to Repair legislation for electronics as well as autos.
You guys are great! A Maker Manifesto for all! I'm tired of the consumption based, throwaway society we have today. We need to get corporations to relinquish this tight-fisted control over everything they manufacture for "sale" (quotes to indicate that they say "sold", even though the consumer often own much of what was purchased) that encourages, no - demands, that merchandise gets thrown away and replaced new to maximize profits. What do you see as the best avenue, personally and as citizens, to encourage people, the government, and companies to pursue the ability to repair our merchandise? Help us build a free repair manual for everything! Join the thousands of people all around the world contributing to make iFixit the largest repair manual in the world. We're building a coalition to fight for access to unlocking tools, service manuals, diagnostics, and everything else we need to repair products. If the people of Massachusetts can stand up for their local auto repair shop, we of the internet can certainly stand up for the right to open our electronics.
Sign up at fixthedmca.org and let people know you want DMCA 1201 repealed.
I own a small business that's an authorized dealer of a major carrier's products and contracts. When I order, e.g., a 16 GB iPhone 5, I pay the full retail price, $650. One of my stores then sells it for $200, as per the carrier's requirement. When someone then proceeds to unlock that phone and activate it on, say, Cricket, I lose $450. The carrier only pays me a portion of the contract if it's kept for at least six months. Were you aware of this? Do you agree that anyone who acts in a similar manner is effectively stealing $450 from me? How can one own an item that he hasn't fully paid for yet (assuming that a device isn't entirely bought until the discount received on it has been compensated via contract)? The customer has to pay an early termination fee, I assume. Who gets that money?
Do you ever break a item while disassembling it? e.g. If you cracked a Ipad digitizer as you removed it while doing a break down. Edit:spelling. Yes. Specifically with the iPad, it was glued together. It took us breaking about five iPads before we developed a technique for opening iPads without harming the glass. Even then, we kept fiddling and improving our methodology.
How do you guys feel about "anti-fixer" hardware like security screws or Torx? I don't really think Torx is anti-fixer—it's a pretty standard tool, there are good technical reasons for it (screws don't strip as easily), and the patent on it has expired (way back in '91). Security bits and tools like Apple's Pentalobe driver are just consumer-hostile.
I had to open up my coffee maker to unclog it and they had flathead screws with a little bar in the middle - you'd need a flathead screwdriver that kinda looked like a two-pronged fork. I have a friend who just spilled liquid on her MacBook Air this afternoon and needs to open up the case to dry it out. But she doesn't have the right sized pentalobe bit already, and it's going to take a few days to mail her one.
Random idea: Mail Pentalobe drivers to libraries in major metro areas, so people can locally access them without the hassle? There's a growing group of tool libraries where they do just that. I think it's a fantastic idea—we recently wrote a story about the West Seattle Tool Library, which is very successful.
You guys are awesome! You helped me start my business in fixing and unlocking devices. I have already emailed my representatives (all of them), signed the petition, and spread the word about how bad the DMCA is. Thank you for your efforts. As for questions, how many DMCA threats do you receive? If so, from what kind of companies? Do they concern you at all? You'll be surprised to hear this: iFixit has never received a DMCA complaint. But there's a good reason for that—all the content on the site is originally created, either by us or by our community members.
We haven't gotten permission from any OEMs to rehost their service information (yet), but it's something that we're working on.
With the recent screenshots of xbox durango, do you think that we are moving toward a time where the used game market will cease to exist? You bought it, you should own it. That applies to music you buy from iTunes, or from Steam, or from the secret XBox market of the future.
But the trend right now is away from ownership, and towards licensing. Apple is very careful to never say that you own the music you download from iTunes.
There's a fantastic group of people working to guarantee your rights to resell the things you buy called the Owner's Rights Initiative. They won a huge victory in the Supreme Court this week in the Kirtsaeng v. Wiley case, verifying that it is legal to resell products in the US that were made overseas. Seems commonsense, but those are the sort of basic battles we have to fight.
If that verdict had gone the other way, we might be talking about whether it's legal to resell your old cell phone—now that would have been a step backwards.
Are you giving away free 6inch rulers? because they are $2.99 and redditlove322 gives $5 off. Yes.
Why isn't the problem the breaking of a contract? The customer is not actually breaking the contract, they're exercising an option in the contract to end the monthly service in exchange for paying an early termination fee.
Your problem is that the carrier wrote the contract, and likely also wrote the business contract with you. Your contract sounds one-sided—the fair thing would be for you to receive a portion of the termination fee to repay you for your subsidy. You're getting squeezed on both ends.
Why isn't there a way to sort the amount of devices on your website by their repairability score? Because we haven't gotten to it yet! But that's a great idea. Our tablet repairability page is our first stab at something like that.
I have used your website to repair a Macbook Pro. I redirect people to your site for a lot of their Apple (and console) problems. I love the idea of a centralized repository of all this knowledge. Is it possible to expand this to cover all devices? If unlocking under contract cell phones is legal. What incentive do mobile carriers have to incentivize high end cell phones? Yes, we're working hard to do it. The problem is that we can't take the manufacturer service manuals and post them on iFixit because of copyright law. If it was legal, we'd have service manuals for everything! So we have to write everything from scratch. You can help—take some photos the next time you fix something and post the seed of a new repair manual. Locking phones isn't required to keep you on a carrier. You already have a contract! The early termination fee should cover any costs to them from your subsidized handset.
What's in it for you? We want to fix the world. I'd like to live in a place where people cared about their things, and products were designed to stand the test of time.
I agree that this should never be an issue and shouldn't be something that we should have to fight for. Everything should be unlocked by default. But you guys are doing amazing things in this fight, so mad props to you. The problem is that software (intellectual property) is infecting hardware, and so the laws that have allowed us to modify and tinker our hardware for hundreds of years are woefully out of date. It won't be long before you can't buy any durable good that doesn't have some software involved.
, ifixit.com is an awesome idea and site and I recently used it to upgrade my aging macbook, saving hundreds of dollars by not buying a new one. Great idea! What do you. think. of. these. guides?
Have you ever considered expanding ifixit beyond apple products and game consoles? Or expansion beyond electronics.. say into DIY car repairs? IFixit is a wiki, and you can add repair manuals for anything you like! So get cracking.
Hi there as a small cellphone and computer shop in my town I like to thank you guys for your work and I support as much as I can when I can ( buying parts and tools. Even if can find it little cheaper somewhere Els. I to support your amazing website ). It helped me many times when I have a rare or unusual item in my shop. How did it all started ? Here's a short summary of how we started iFixit back in 2003: Link to www.ifixit.com
Are there any ways that manufacturers are making it easier to repair devices? I think Dell deserves more press than they've gotten for the XPS 10. It's clear that serviceability was a design priority throughout, and it's a great device. I have the trackpad + battery dock, and it's a great product.
They color coded the screws, used easy tabs to get into the case, and made the battery very easy to remove.
Did you guys sell your tool kit to Best Buy, I saw a similar kit in geek squad to what I have at home? Not yet, although we'd love to sell tools through them. You can buy them from Amazon online as well as direct from us. Radio Shack is selling our tools at a few stores—if you don't see them in your local store, ask them to stock them!
Hi guys, love your site 'cus I'm a fixer. _^ I've rebuilt many an engine for myself and friends. The best way for a friend to get me to fix their stuff is to say : "It's OK, don't worry. I'll just get a new one." LOL That pushes my buttons and I'll have it fixed pronto! I'm wondering about the (maybe few) positive outcomes of regulation. I'd love to hear your take on modifications to devices that then negatively effect other people. I know many guys who modify the emission control system on their cars in order to get better mileage or have better pick-up. This gives all of us a worse environment. Sometimes people misalign their headlights and/or put in super-bright halogens. These blind me when approaching at night. Also, what if someone modified their electronics in such a way that throws off a ton of RF noise, thus disrupting the electronics of others (phone, Bluetooth, WiFi). Mufflers on motorcycles that are just TOO loud are another example. These issues are more troublesome in cities where we live close to each other. This would probably require many more "spot checks" by authorities to be sure that your device/caboat/etc was in compliance. They do this now for people who mod their street-legal cars, but they will typically just target the low-riders or the Asian imports that are altered. I'd hate if this practice was extended to the whole population. We would creep closer toward a police state. So what is your stance on regulation (and its enforcement) for beneficial things? Where do we draw the line and how do we be sure people comply? This is a great question, and I'd like to have a conversation about this separately. Please ask our repair tech community over on meta.ifixit.com and see what they think. They might have a more nuanced perspective on this than I would.
What has been the most difficult project for you? Not standing up to the DMCA, or any kind of campaigning stuff - I'm asking about phones/consoles/etc. The hardest part for us is figuring out how to make servicing glued devices economical. The solution involves new tools, techniques, and instructions. We've thrown away entire repair manuals and started from scratch because we thought the procedure was too difficult for people to use. Our iOpener is a really cool new tool for opening glued tablets, and took about a year of tinkering to perfect.
Would you please give us a bitcoin address where we can PAY OUR SUPPORT ?? We should set something up for fixthedmca.org. We could be the first bitcoin-funded PAC! I'm sure that would ruffle some feathers.
Is the Surface Pro really that bad? Yes. But don't take my word for it—CNET / Techrepublic also took it apart, and came to the same conclusions that we did.
From their report: "[Microsoft] took one of worst tablet design elements (a glued on front panel) and married it with one of the worst laptop elements (an over abundance of screws) to create a device that’s more difficult to crack open than even the Apple iPad."
Just wanted to say Thanks for making such great tools. They guides are pretty awesome too, but the tools are sweet. Just got my Magnetic Project Mat and I love it. Any way you want to sponsor an IT guy and give me a bunch of tools? Keep up the great work! Shameless plug: I love my Pro Tech Toolkit, and the Magnetic Project Mat has changed how I fix things.
Unrelated, but would love the question answered. GF would love to move back to SLO. Any chance I could get a job? We do have a couple positions open in SLO.
Not really a question directed to you, but just on the topic in general. In the US, are you not allowed to unlock your phone? Here in Ireland we simply go to our network's shop, give them our phone and a day later, it's unlocked and ready to use on any network, free of charge. It's newly illegal as of January of this year. Thanks, Mr. Librarian of Congress!
In some countries—including Brazil—it's illegal to sell locked cell phones. I guess we're a little less secure in our capitalism than they are.
I can't thank your site enough! I use it to fix all of my electronics and customers computers. Before i even open a device, I take a look at your site and check to see what cables I have to be aware of, so I don't break any when taking apart the thing. Have you thought about opening a physical location and selling your merchandise and maybe offer computer servicing? We have thousands of technicians who contribute to iFixit and run local repair businesses. I'd never want to compete with them—they're a lot better at fixing things than I am!
Do you have the stats from that old satisfaction survey on peoples favorite star wars film? Yes, I've got that around somewhere. I'll have rummage around the dusty regions of my drive platters for them. I'm pretty sure Jar Jar lost.
You guys stole a friend of mine's photo of an Xserve without attribution (it was CC just requiring credit). He emailed you about it several times with no response. What fuck? I don't know anything about that! Have him send it again to support at ifixit and we'll get right on it. iFixit is community driven, so it could have been a contributor. But we're eager to fix it!
Hey Kyle, I know it's not the reason you're here, but are you going to do a teardown of the new 27" iMac? We've got a repair manual well underway. Stay tuned.
Love the website and love the prices, but when will you have more of these in stock? Probably not soon. Best to find a water damaged one somewhere and salvage the part.
An IMEI blacklist has now been released by checkesnfree, but no database to check purchase date of phones to confirm the 1/26/13 cutoff. As a repair shop how am I supposed to know when a customer bought a phone, or whether they are lying to illegally unlock a phone? Is it really fair for us to have them sign a waiver to pass the blame off to the customer in case of a lawsuit? Good question, and I have absolutely no idea.
> Is it really fair?
Nope. But then, who said the law was supposed to be fair?
What are your opinions on E-waste? We've written extensively about e-waste (see the Wired articles I linked to above, as well as iFixit.org). It's a huge problem, and the best solution is to make our products last as long as possible.
Locking phones limits their ability to be reused, and the practice is responsible for hundreds of millions of phones going out of use prematurely. Locking hurts resale prices, it hurts consumers, and it hurts the environment.
Well If I can buy a car and make mods to it or buy a computer and mod it. I see no reason why I shouldn't be able to mod a phone or anything else. Good Luck guys! Thanks. The issue is software infecting the hardware world. If they put an encrypted interface to your car, it would be illegal to unencrypt it and modify it, thanks to section 1201 of the DMCA. That's gotta change.
The post-'96, pre-late-2000s cars hit the sweet spot: they had OBD II ports, but were devoid of crazy electronic nannies and gremlins. My DD is a '98 Accord, and that's almost as good as it gets. +1.
My 68-year-old mother replaced the battery in her MacBook Air by herself a couple of days ago thanks to you guys. You rock! Awesome! Got any photos?
We collect repair stories over here.
MJ is the best host you have had on iFixit. Hands down. Thanks! Here's MJ's take on the cell phone unlocking situation.
Just last Friday I used your website to fix my Galaxy Nexus (grandfathered in to unlimited data) with nothing more than eye glasses screwdrivers and some guitar picks. Thank you for saving me from a 5fb download limit or having to pay $600 for an unlocked phone. You guys rock! Link to cdn.memegenerator.net
If youre asking, you already know the answer. Shhh.
Just wanted to say thanks for the wealth of information you provide. When I taught my ACMT course in Las Vegas I recommended your site over Apples GSX for out of warranty repairs. Used it myself frequently and will continue to even though I'm no longer a technician. Thanks! And please, help us get better. There's an edit button on every step and we need all the people with technical expertise we can get.
Hey, I did work for you guys through my college class (ENGL 149 at Cal Poly SLO) and because of my work I actually got a job! I just wanted to say thank you very much <3. Here's the page I worked on: Link to www.ifixit.com. I'm the hand model <3. Awesome! What job did you get?
Hey guys! its Caleb from hackaday. I just wanted to say you've come a LONG way over the years and I'm happy to use you as a resource when people ask me about gadget repairs. Keep going! Thanks, Caleb. The community deserves the credit—they're the ones who have expanded our manuals so dramatically. I'm constantly amazed at the cool repair how-tos I find on the site.
I just want to tell you that I love your website and that you have saved me hundreds of dollars in repair costs for my Apple products via ifixit.com. Thanks! I paid patalbwil to say that.
Just wanted to say 'thanks' for everything you guys have done and are continuing to do. I started a Mac repair business over three years ago and I couldn't have done it without all of the amazing guides on iFixit.com. Keep up the good work! Awesome, that's great to hear. We love helping people start businesses.
Pass it along—teach someone how to fix something over on iFixit.
Probably too late, just wanted to say thanks for ifixit. I've bought a few tools there, fixed my xbox controller, and I'm in the process of fixing my ps3 laser. You're very welcome! I'm not responsible for most of that—it's our global community that wrote those guides. It's incredible how much knowledgable people are willing to share.
I met iFixIt at Bay Area Maker Faire in 2011 and 2012 and want to thank you for who you are and for all you do to make a DIY-er's life easier. Let me know if you need a spare pair of booth hands for 2013. I don't think we'll be exhibiting this year so we can focus on our online work, but we're happy to support anyone who wants to represent repair at the faire. It's a great show.
As a fellow Calpoly CPE, how well would you say that Calpoly prepared you for the 'real world'? (Also, will you ever go beer tasting with Collin?) Our work is pretty broad—we're taking apart hardware one day, hacking code the next, and writing op-eds for Wired the next. So it was very useful, but we've had to teach ourselves a fair amount along the way.
So they can turn a profit, yo. All the products for those tear-downs don't come cheap. Plus you get a high quality screen + get great customer support. There's a pretty broad spectrum in quality between parts out there. We test every single screen we sell and stand behind our parts with long warranties.
Last updated: 2013-03-27 06:27 UTC
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