Bitcoin, Litecoin, Peercoin, Namecoin, and Novacoin: What

35C3: rehrar report

What up, scrubs? For those who didn't know, I was funded by the community to go to 35C3. Those who thought it was a good value, donated for me to go, those who didn't didn't. As is the FFS way.
But because I did get funded and because I did go, I'm doing a report to say how things went from my perspective. Other key players may do their own report, so keep an eye out for those.
I arrived on the 26th, and Riat had already done 92.367% of the setup for our cluster. I helped with whatever I could, chatted and met with the other volunteers, and went out to eat with Dimi from Monerujo and Jeremy Rand from NameCoin. More on these guys soon.
For those of you who haven't been to C3 before, there's nothing quite like it. It's something you have to experience. It can't really be described. The aesthetic is overwhelming, and the beautiful blend of artistry and technology really makes the conference unique and stand apart from anything else. I was able to walk around for a bit with parasew on that first day as well, and we looked at the surface of what C3 had to offer.
The real work started the next day. Our cluster was the "Critical Decentralization Cluster" and had several different assemblies as part of it:
The cluster was set up in such a way to give each of these assemblies their own space, where they can talk and run their own stuff. Monero, of course, took center stage.
To the internal crowd (those running the cluster) the most noticable portions of my work were taking many duties off of parasew's shoulders in terms of running the cluster. He and his comrades had been working for long days prior to my arrival, so by the time C3 had arrived, they were quite tired. I did what I could (scheduling, MCing, and solving other unexpected problems as they come up) to make sure they weren't stressed out of their minds.
To people not a part of the cluster, the most visible portion of my work was definitely being the master of ceremonies for the stage. We had talks and workshops running concurrently during the majority of opening hours (you can view our schedule here), and I was there to both introduce the speakers, graciously hint when they were going overtime, and stall for the AV team when they needed some time to make adjustments.
Things that are most applicable to the Monero community that I did include:
I got to spend good time and have quality discussions with many people in the Monero community that are Europe-based. For the sake of their privacy I will not reveal all of them (they can do so in the comments if they'd like), but among them were: m2049r from Monerujo, parasew, Michael from hardware, dsc, and binaryFate (he's always a good time).
One of the unexpected highlights of the conference was getting to talk with Jeremy Rand from NameCoin (one of the other few legitimate uses of blockchain besides decentralized money. Satoshi thought so, and worked a bit on BitDNS, the precursor to namecoin). If you haven't yet checked out that project, I encourage you to do so. Our projects both hold healthy respect for each other. He was very smart, and we had some great discussions about further future collaboration.
I got sick the last day (I think somebody was spreading it around, cuz a few other people felt under the weather that same day), and even today I have an annoying residual cough, but I still did my best to give 110% (down from 125%).
In all, it was a great experience, and I think a great success for Monero. Because C3 is very anti-commercial, Monero and Bitcoin were the only two cryptocurrencies to have a meaningful presence (just like Defcon), and I think this was very optically important. Everyone got to see that Monero is still not just alive, but going strong as other projects drop like flies around us. It shows that Monero is still just as ideologically driven as ever, and, to my understanding, the C3 organizers were very happy with us and the content we provided, and want us back next year.
Thanks to everyone who donated for me to go. I hope you have a happy new year.
submitted by Rehrar to Monero [link] [comments]

Charlie Lee's (aka coblee) final thoughts on Merged Mining

I'm glad to see that my post has got the community talking. This is what I wanted to do. Sorry for trying to scare you guys into action. Most shibes do not realize how bad the situation is and will become.
I was around when Namecoin went through the rollercoaster difficulty problem and had to merged mine in 2011. I've mined Namecoin and I have also mined Namecoin merged mined with Bitcoin. I created Litecoin and spent 3 years working on it seeing it go from a CPU coin to a GPU coin and now a ASIC coin. I've seen many coins get attacked for lulz. So there are only a few people that truly understands the situation you are in as well as I do. Most of them are happy to sit back and make popcorn. But, I felt responsible for doing something (anything) to try to help. The first time I approached you guys, I thought it was win/win for Dogecoin and Litecoin. Today, it's pretty much only to help Dogecoin survive. I own some Doge, not a trivial amount but also not a huge amount. So I won't lose sleep over it if it goes to 0, but I am definitely not doing this to protect my investment. And I don't make posts to try to manipulate the market.
You may not have liked the way I presented the facts in my post. Some think it's FUD. Maybe I did do a little of that to scare people to action. But whatever the case, at least it's working. Some of you hate me. Some of you think that I'm an egotistical maniac that just came here to gloat and say I told you so. Whatever. I'm too thick-skinned to let this bother me. I do what I feel is right. All I know is that I will hate to live with the fact that I knowingly let dogecoin get attacked when I could have done something about it. Maybe it's because if Litecoin is my child, Dogecoin is my grandchild (or is it my child's dog?) The community and good will you have built in such a short time is admirable. I would hate to see it get destroyed by someone doing it for lulz. And if Dogecoin does get attacked, it will be bad for all of crypto-currency. Dogecoin introduced a lot of new people to crypto-currency. These people will be hurt the most. And that's bad for everyone.
I still see a lot of confusion about merged mining, and I would like to clarify as much as I can:
And if you have questions about how merged mining works, please read my whole merged mining AMA again. It answers all your questions about why merged mining does not hurt dogecoin price. And why merged mining is really the best solution to this unique problem.
I will be around to answer any questions. (But please read the AMA first) And I am at the Chicago Bitcoin conference today and will be at CoinCongress in San Francisco on Wednesday/Thursday. If anyone wants to approach me to talk in person, I will be glad to. I don't bite... really, I don't. :)
*EDIT: I tipped the top posts each 1000 doge until I ran out of coins. I got most of these coins as thanks when I did the AMA. Figure I should pass these back to people who are contributing to this conversation. Thanks! *
submitted by coblee to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Merged Mining: Analysis of Effects and Implications

Date: 2017-08-24
Author(s): Alexei Zamyatin, Edgar Weippl

Link to Paper


Abstract
Merged mining refers to the concept of mining more than one cryptocurrency without necessitating additional proof-of-work effort. Merged mining was introduced in 2011 as a boostrapping mechanism for new cryptocurrencies and countermeasures against the fragmentation of mining power across competing systems. Although merged mining has already been adopted by a number of cryptocurrencies, to this date little is known about the effects and implications.
In this thesis, we shed light on this topic area by performing a comprehensive analysis of merged mining in practice. As part of this analysis, we present a block attribution scheme for mining pools to assist in the evaluation of mining centralization. Our findings disclose that mining pools in merge-mined cryptocurrencies have operated at the edge of, and even beyond, the security guarantees offered by the underlying Nakamoto consensus for extended periods. We discuss the implications and security considerations for these cryptocurrencies and the mining ecosystem as a whole, and link our findings to the intended effects of merged mining.

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submitted by dj-gutz to myrXiv [link] [comments]

Echoes of the Past: Recovering Blockchain Metrics From Merged Mining

Cryptology ePrint Archive: Report 2018/1134
Date: 2018-11-22
Author(s): Nicholas Stifter, Philipp Schindler, Aljosha Judmayer, Alexei Zamyatin, Andreas Kern, Edgar Weippl

Link to Paper


Abstract
So far, the topic of merged mining has mainly been considered in a security context, covering issues such as mining power centralization or crosschain attack scenarios. In this work we show that key information for determining blockchain metrics such as the fork rate can be recovered through data extracted from merge mined cryptocurrencies. Specifically, we reconstruct a long-ranging view of forks and stale blocks in Bitcoin from its merge mined child chains, and compare our results to previous findings that were derived from live measurements. Thereby, we show that live monitoring alone is not sufficient to capture a large majority of these events, as we are able to identify a non-negligible portion of stale blocks that were previously unaccounted for. Their authenticity is ensured by cryptographic evidence regarding both, their position in the respective blockchain, as well as the Proof-of-Work difficulty.
Furthermore, by applying this new technique to Litecoin and its child cryptocur rencies, we are able to provide the first extensive view and lower bound on the stale block and fork rate in the Litecoin network. Finally, we outline that a recovery of other important metrics and blockchain characteristics through merged mining may also be possible.

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submitted by dj-gutz to myrXiv [link] [comments]

Merged Mining: Curse or Cure?

Cryptology ePrint Archive: Report 2017/791
Date: 2017-08-22
Author(s): Aljosha Judmayer, Alexei Zamyatin, Nicholas Stifter, Artemios Voyiatzis, Edgar Weippl

Link to Paper


Abstract
Merged mining refers to the concept of mining more than one cryptocurrency without necessitating additional proof-of-work effort. Although merged mining has been adopted by a number of cryptocurrencies already, to this date little is known about the effects and implications. We shed light on this topic area by performing a comprehensive analysis of merged mining in practice. As part of this analysis, we present a block attribution scheme for mining pools to assist in the evaluation of mining centralization. Our findings disclose that mining pools in merge-mined cryptocurrencies have operated at the edge of, and even beyond, the security guarantees offered by the underlying Nakamoto consensus for extended periods. We discuss the implications and security considerations for these cryptocurrencies and the mining ecosystem as a whole, and link our findings to the intended effects of merged mining.

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submitted by dj-gutz to myrXiv [link] [comments]

"Code is Law": Comedy Gold Survey on Ethereum

Survey ID: 00001 Coin: Ethereum Client: Tyler Durden

Executive summary:

Ethereum is almost certainly the number 2 coin in comedy gold. It will likely surpass Bitcoin in comedy gold long before it passes it in market cap. Thanks in large part to a spam-based marketing campaign on Reddit, it also has a dedicated base of critics.
After its IPO, it was known as “Inthereum” for a while, infinitely powerful of course, as vaporware can do anything. It had a major version release, then another. Finally, a major smart contract, in terms of valuation, came along: The DAO. Not to be confused with other DAOs, before and after. The DAO was the biggest. It was going to be the best; it already was the best! Euphoria was off the charts.
Until just a few months in, a bug was found. And the killer app became the flash point. What could they do? Well, hard fork and give the money back, of course! And so they did.
“Code is Law”; but this is actually good for Ethereum because “[a]lthough some do question the analogy ‘code is law’. I do not. We just found out that we have a supreme court, the community!” [1]
After the D'OH, Ethereum struggles to top its ATH comedy gold, but there is still a bright future for popcorn and comedy gold from Ethereum.

5 Largest Veins of Comedy Gold

Here are the largest comedy gold veins in Ethereum in potential reserves in our estimation in approximately descending order:
  • Cultlike euphoria - Now, this can certainly be said to be common to almost all cryptocurrencies. But Ethereum seems special here, even more than Bitcoin's community. There is a real belief here that this coin is going to change the world. This helps play into a "this is very good for Ethereum" mindset, wherein even the D'OH fork was a great success!
There is no greater terror than a fiend on ether.
  • Vitalik Buterin - The best name in cryptocurrency! Young genius central to Ethereum and almost universally seen as the most important leader in the project. In our view, his endorsement and leadership during the D'OH fork led to that route being taken. That is, we believe if he had opposed it from the start, he may have been able to prevent it or at least have led to what is now called ETC being the dominant of the two.
And so in our view, Mr. Buterin runs a billion dollar cryptocurrency right now. He and his team seem to have done reasonably well so far; it seems likely they'll continue to thrive. To the best of my knowledge, confirmed on /ethereum, there hasn't been a drug market implemented in Ethereum or trading with ETH so far. But while it seems like a terrible idea, because of the lack of privacy and proven mutability of contracts, it seems like eventually there's going to be a major drug market accepting ETH just because it has such a high value. And, they point out, monero and zcoin’s core privacy feature will apparently be available on ETH after this next fork, so look forward to anonymous ETH fueling drug markets!
And then the interesting question will be raised of how Chief Justice Buterin will rule on the case, whether it is worthy of an intervention or not. If not a drug market, then another buggy and hacked contract. Or a hacked exchange, and the question of whether to make it or its users whole, or "let the hacker win".
  • DAOs - From the beginning, it was proposed that Ethereum itself and its reserve fund would be turned into a DAO. How exactly this was going to happen would be figured out later of course. There was an initial estimate of 2016 for the transition.
Of course, in 2016, The DAO and the D'OH happened. I'm not aware of a current further push to put all of ETH's future funding into a DAO. But I'm sure the topic will resurface. And it will be hilarious on so many levels. The DAO actually collapsed too soon for peak comedy gold extraction. It had been predicted that there would be no consensus on any proposals and that nothing would be funded, and that there would be gold from that. But it was just a few months in when the bug was found. And while the D'OH fork was certainly a rich vein of comedy gold, it wasn't as rich as what the DAO could have been if it had floundered around for a year or so before the hack.
Surprisingly, there's actually a running, apparently working DAO on ETH that was started even before The DAO: digixDAO. If it keeps on running, it will continue to be hilarious as other DAOs fail to learn from it. If it fails, there's all the more hilarity for Ethereum, making it the platform where anything complicated enough to look like an original use case will break. The very existence of digix is proof-of-comedy-gold.
  • Immutability - The whole central notion of immutability is going to be a recurring question for Ethereum after the D'OH. While there was a lot of sentiment of "just this once and never again" at the time, there will someday be another major issue, and the precedent will mean that at least a major debate among the community will be had. Ethereum is "mostly immutable". Bitcoin is far better protected here, because while it's true they've hard forked to fix a bug before, that was years ago and the community is far more fractured now. Ethereum has a demonstrated capacity to do both routine and controversial hard forks. This strength is also a challenge, as it will invite constant legal and ethical questions about when it's appropriate to modify the chain itself with a fork: that is, rolling back some or all transactions after major bugs, thefts, frauds, and so forth.
  • Concentration of funds - This one I'm just guessing at. Although rich lists do exist, obviously one entity like an exchange could pool funds in an address without one person owning that much, or one person could splits their coins among many accounts. But it gives a rough guide. In Bitcoin, the top 113 addresses, having more than 10,000 BTC, in total are 17.46% of the current supply [ 2 ]. And in Ethereum, it's true that the top two accounts are marked as exchange accounts [ 3 ]. Still, having lots of funds concentrated in a single exchange wallet seems to still have some potential for comedy gold. In Ethereum, the top 50 addresses have more than double the proportion of the top 113 in Bitcoin, a bit over 40% of the current supply. My guess would be there are still a lot of people who invested heavily in the initial ICO who have held onto a significant portion of their initial ETH. While some of these top addresses are exchanges, I think there are probably many individuals represented in here as well, and every one of them is a multimillionaire from this account alone.
Of course, so far, because ETH is still smaller than BTC in overall market cap, these top addresses aren't as huge as the top addresses in Bitcoin in current market value. But if ETH were to overtake BTC's current position with a relatively unchanged distribution, there would be some real comedy gold coming off this factor. Cribs could have a spin-off Ethereum series.
This concentration was a part of making The D'OH what it was in my view as well: in Bitcoin, there would never have been so much of the coin tied up in one particular venture, at least not now. But in Ethereum, this concentration and groupthink can combine to hilarious effect.

A Brief History of Comedy Gold in Ethereum:

“Laws, like sausages, cease to inspire respect in proportion as we know how they are made” - John Godfrey Saxe
In the beginning, there was an offering. The greatest coin the world had ever seen; step right up and buy it! There was even code; this is no vaporware! Sure, there was more work to be done, but the ICO would fund that work, the founders would get a little, and create a reserve for the future and the rest would be mineable.
There was also some of the most vociferous objections on BCT, declaring that the stake allocated to the founders was too large, pointing to other coins which had done smaller or done without. Arguing against the reserve; arguing against having a presale at all. Some people, of course, completely failing to read the documentation accurately to see what was even being proposed. And an almost complete radio silence from this large team working around the clock on Ethereum.
It took some months from when the initial ANN was made until the sale actually started, but by the time they had their sale, they had perhaps the best documentation at launch to-date. Of course, there were some areas which seemed to lack some detail, like the budgeting, but never mind that, it was finally launching!
Launching the sale, at least. In July and August of 2014, Ether was first sold. It was described as “fuel” for the virtual machine they were going to build [ 4 ].
And then, a year later, Ethereum was released live. By July 2016, it had already had its first major crisis after The DAO was hacked and the D’OH fork introduced in response.
But the fact that Ethereum was ever released, and that it was released so quickly, is truly incredible. There was more than one person who thought that the stated goals of Ethereum were not possible. And, of course, many initial goals and deadlines didn’t happen. But unlike the railbirds on BCT were convinced, the team did not fail nor did it run off with the money. They were given a blank check, and they actually delivered a working product which has been successful so far financially.
Of course, having its flagship smart contract go belly-up quite so quickly after having finally gotten a “killer app” seems rather unfortunate. The oracle problem (the question of how to reliably relate smart contracts to the outside world) seems unresolved, but partial solutions are inevitable and can only serve to make increasingly complex and thus popcorn-loaded contracts possible.
Right now, all seems relatively quiet. But rest assured, there remains plenty of euphoria and gas to drive many more cycles of comedy gold production. Ether huffers need something to throw their ETH at. The more complicated; the better! Given some of the creations that have been made in NXT, for instance, a few more years of creativity on ETH should yield some very complicated and pop-corn rich smart contracts.

Researcher’s Narrative:

I was relaxing in my office, waiting for business. It was a dingy little one-room affair, but it would serve for now. Particularly with no clients. I had poured myself a double shot, and was about to enjoy it, when suddenly the door opened.
A man walked in, familiar somehow although I couldn't place him. I reached out my hand instinctively, and instead of shaking it, he handed me a dollar.
"Hello?"
He pointed at the sign in the window, advertising a promotional one dollar gold survey for the first client. Always astute, I quickly surmised he wished to hire me.
"Of course, sir! What coin would you like?"
"Ethereum."
"Certainly! And may I have your name for the log?"
"Tyler Durdan."
And with that, my newest client left. I downed my double and poured a generous triple to follow it. This was going to be a long day.
Ethereum was the ultimate prize in my line of work. The coin which proved the adage that truth is stranger than fiction; which had proved itself a lucrative source of comedy gold.
And who am I? Guy Noir, private comedy gold surveyor. I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Premined scamcoins crashing on noname exchanges. I watched popcorn glitter in the dark on forgotten the BCT threads. Popcorn junkies strung out on a high, and I've delivered them more comedy gold, popcorn, salt and butter. There is never enough.
A dark night in a world that never sleeps and knows how to keep its secrets...But on the 12th Floor of the Acme Building, one man is still trying to find the answers to life's persistent questions: Guy Noir, private comedy gold surveyor.
Thank you, Narrator. Now, as I was saying, Ethereum is overloaded with gold. But the core is pretty straightforward:
Ethereum promised "smart contracts". Immutable. Turing-complete. This was what Bitcoin lacked. The bee's knees. Crypto 2.0. What could go wrong?
We'll skip over the "Inthereum" period. Perhaps the vaporware criticism was never fair: from their version, they had Proof-of-Concept code; they went through some iterations and eventually got to release.
Let's note clearly that there was plenty of time to determine some sort of official policy for what to do about a buggy or improperly written contract losing money. In Bitcoin, every hack has been a SFYL event, although it’s true that a bug in the coin itself was hard forked away before. Mt. Gox tried to blame malleability, but there was never a fork to try to recover funds. In Ethereum, immutability was often talked about. So far as I saw in skimming, “what if” scenarios to undo bugs wasn’t brought up front-and-center. Nor was immutability being debated that I saw.
So Ethereum releases. A major contract is launched, The DAO, which gets an astonishing portion of ETH invested. The world's largest crowd sale as they ultimately called it. All the major players in ETH buy into it, including Vitalik Buterin, the creator of Ethereum and the best name in cryptocurrency.
Just as they're starting to get into the comedy gold that The DAO doesn't really have a purpose, a bug is discovered. And just as its leader is assuring everyone that no funds are at risk, the funds start being drained out of the contract by an unknown party.
And suddenly immutable means "immutable unless we screw up on the biggest contract which everyone important has invested in heavily". Ethereum ultimately hard-forks to return investor funds and basically unwind The DAO. After claiming that the bug was in the contract, the coin itself is hard forked to fix the issue. And the first Ethereum clone results, one which simply does not follow the new hard fork.
So the natural question is: when can a contract be changed? In the first page of the Ethereum launch, this question was implied by asking about what would happen if there were an assassination market hosted by a smart contract on Ethereum. Of course, in reality, Ethereum is not really functional enough at present to enforce such a contract, but the question remains in case Ethereum were to actually attain a functioning smart contract platform.
Attempted reference to Tears in rain monologue, credit to Rutger Hauer
Guy Noir and narrator text lovingly stolen from Prairie Home Companion's Guy Noir, by Garrison B. Keillor.

Researcher’s Rant

Filed for psych eval
Twenty pages into the BCT ANN, I believe I have contracted cancer, again. I’m reminded of why I don’t generally go on BCT. As bad as altcoin forums tend to be for their circlejerking, it’s almost better than the, well, there’s really no way to put it other than FUD that inevitably appears in response to anything. Of course, it’s not paid shilling so much as it is willful and vocal ignorance. For all the critiques in that thread, most of them are utter nonsense and simply are misreading the initial information. On the other hand, it’s January 27th in the thread by now, with February 1st and the pre-sale start, and they don’t have their “prospectus” up yet. I also haven’t seen the change in mining rate yet.
Side note: eMunie; wtf? I guess I missed something? Either it’s gone through a namechange or it’s dead, because a quick coinmarketcap search didn’t find anything. A comedy gold mining project for another day.
Great; spoiler alert: fundraiser delayed apparently, so even more cancer to read through in that thread on the way to getting to a prospectus!
The first 44 pages of the thread was summarized thus: “I want to believe. Why are you not speaking to us? Throw me a bone. Just tell me what I want to hear, and I'll gladly throw my money in.” [ 5 ] Would that I had only had to read that quote rather than all 44 pages, and facing many more.
Pages and comments dragged on as I waded through the low-grade popcorn. When would this prospectus be released, so my torment would end? Oh god: a side-thread shows that by the time they get to April, there’s still no prospectus or presale date or estimate of when there may be a date [ 6 ]. It’s time to give up on reading through the cancerous mainthread on BCT and start jumping ahead pages to find the pre-sale and prospectus.
Okay, finally, in July, they release documents and start the sale [ 7 ]. Good enough.
I have mountains of links on my desk. Comedy gold is overflowing, but this is a survey expedition, not a mining operation. But by the time it’s surveyed, there’s always so much gold lined up to mine it gets hard to leave it behind and leave with the samples.
It’s time to hammer out some copy and close this file.
Folks, we hope you’ve enjoyed this descent into madness and comedy gold brought to you by the Comedy Gold Survey Company and our patron Tyler Durden. Do you need more comedy gold in your life? Of course you do! So please donate today; every $1 helps! I’ve added a new special: $5 lets you choose the next coin to be surveyed!
Thanks again to Tyler Durden, and I will now be re-watching Fight Club and questioning my sanity. Cheers y’all!
Resources:
Edit: 3/26/2020: Removed a link to a comment per request from the user.
Footnotes and other links:
submitted by coinaday to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

A Quick analysis of the current Crypto Coins (Btc,eth,etc and others)

I've been involved with crypto currencies when BTC was trading at around $100. I'm been a long time holder of BTC and more recently ETH. Here is my quick analysis for anyone who might find it valuable.
BTC - Bitcoin is the most popular and most trusted of all the "cryptos". There is however a debate around block size and whether bitcoin should be a transaction network trying to beat VISA/Paypal or a settlement network (larger amounts/fees, but less transaction volume). This debate has been going on for over a year. So far, bitcoin is more like an electronic gold, a store of value. For the Chinese, who dominate bitcoin transaction volume, it may be a useful way to move money out of China. Chinese miners make up the majority so basically, they have a huge influence in the direction of bitcoin. There are currently two ETFs attempting to hit mainstream markets (Winklevoss and SolidX). A conclusion to the the block size debate, or each of these ETFs actually being available would most likely be a precursor to btc price increasing.
http://www.coindesk.com/what-is-the-bitcoin-block-size-debate-and-why-does-it-matte
http://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-core-ethereum-hard-fork-unsettling-precedent/
Ethereum - Ethereum is taking the blockchain technology a step further by allow programs to actually run on the blockchain. The bitcoin blockchain allows for some very simple processing to happen (mainly making sure funds are sent/received correctly). After bitcoin, there were a bunch of the other coins that had slightly different features (namecoin, ripple, dash, etc). Ethereum's goal is to be a platform by which any feature can be built on top of the blockchain. My view is that ethereum makes all other alt coins pretty much obsolete. With ethereum you can pretty much recreate any existing coin. I think ether at its current price of $12-15 is very undervalued. The things you can build on top of ethereum are significant and are in fact, sometimes other platforms.
The DAO was one of those significant initiatives but it had a flaw in its software and was hacked. It is expected for early software to have problems, but I'm optimistic that these issues will be resolved over time. The ethereum community was able to come to a consensus and adapt which is a very positive sign. The opposing view is that immutability should conquer all, but I believe adaption is more important than immutability. I take my cue from nature that rewarding adaptability is the right decision. Crowdfunding with Ether is a great concept and eventually the right platform will emerge.
China is a big player in the crypto world and it has yet to really get into Ethereum. This will most likely change as Devcon 2 (Ethereum developer conference) will be in Shanghai in September.
It is why I am now mostly investing in Ether it is one of the best investment opportunities around today.
ETHC - Today poloniex allowed people who had ETH before the hard fork to have the same amount of ETC. This was a really strange move on their part as it basically gave the hacker liquidity. It makes me think the hacker could have a relationship with members of poloniex or poloniex is profiting on this move beyond just fees. In other words, it makes poloniex look shady and integrity is last thing an exchange should be trading for $$. My advice is to stay as far away from ETHC or ETC as possible as it has no long term value. No one is going to be building things on top of this and miners will not be mining this long term. If you have ETC, sell it.
STEEM - Speaking of pump and dump coins, another crypto I have a lot of concern over is STEEM. STEEM's concept is interesting because it brings crypto in to the mainstream. It is system where people get rewarded for writing good content, but if you follow the money, people are basically being paid with STEEEM dollars that have been pumped up. It seems the majority holders are paying people to write articles, which pumps up the STEEM currency, bringing in more buyers of the crypto. It seems like a ponzi-scheme because these kinds of economic models have never really worked before. It just doesn't make sense that some of the content being produced is getting so much money. Don't be fooled into thinking that this can continue in any real sustainable form. The only reason you should be buying this is to sell it higher to the next fool down the road. My advice is to stay away from this.
Good luck out and there!
submitted by bitbuds to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Flux: Revisiting Near Blocks for Proof-of-Work Blockchains

Cryptology ePrint Archive: Report 2018/415
Date: 2018-05-29
Author(s): Alexei Zamyatin∗, Nicholas Stifter, Philipp Schindler, Edgar Weippl, William J. Knottenbelt∗

Link to Paper


Abstract
The term near or weak blocks describes Bitcoin blocks whose PoW does not meet the required target difficulty to be considered valid under the regular consensus rules of the protocol. Near blocks are generally associated with protocol improvement proposals striving towards shorter transaction confirmation times. Existing proposals assume miners will act rationally based solely on intrinsic incentives arising from the adoption of these changes, such as earlier detection of blockchain forks.
In this paper we present Flux, a protocol extension for proof-of-work blockchains that leverages on near blocks, a new block reward distribution mechanism, and an improved branch selection policy to incentivize honest participation of miners. Our protocol reduces mining variance, improves the responsiveness of the underlying blockchain in terms of transaction processing, and can be deployed without conflicting modifications to the underlying base protocol as a velvet fork. We perform an initial analysis of selfish mining which suggests Flux not only provides security guarantees similar to pure Nakamoto consensus, but potentially renders selfish mining strategies less profitable.

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submitted by dj-gutz to myrXiv [link] [comments]

Atlas ATS launches Options markets(calls& puts) in BTC & other alt-coins

Atlas ATS Inc. Launches ‘Atlas 2.0’ Atlas ATS is pleased to announce the launch of ‘Atlas 2.0’ exchange platform now supporting trading in alt coins, options for digital currency as well as an array of advanced native order types for FIX API clients. New York, NY March 22, 2014
New York based Atlas ATS Inc. has announced the launch of ‘Atlas 2.0’ on both its Hong Kong and North America based digital currency exchanges. The new platform provides trading for major alternative digital currencies, derivative products, a new multi-signature transaction wallet and a larger selection for advanced order types for clients using the FIX interface.
Atlas provides the digital-currency space with a Wall Street grade exchange platform deployed on a global, secure, low latency private network managed by Perseus Telecom.
Atlas ATS is making this preview available to existing clients ahead of the public announcement, and as a show of gratitude for support and loyalty, Atlas ATS is awarding a $10 credit to each client for the first 100 clients to place a trade in options or any of the newly available alt coins. The credit is limited to $10 per user.
All open orders on the system are being cancelled for the upgrade of the platform. Clients will need to enter new orders once the system upgrade is completed.
The following features are available immediately on newest release of Atlas 2.0
Major Alt Coins such as litecoin and namecoin:
Atlas ATS now supports three major alt coins providing more products to trade.
Digital Currency Options for bitcoin and litecoin:
Atlas ATS presently offers two types of options contracts 'Calls' and 'Puts', which confer upon the owner the right to buy and sell, respectively, the underlying crypto-currency at a set 'strike' price on a given 'expiration' date.
Fees on options trades follow the same add/remove (A.K.A: maketaker) model. The rebate earned when adding liquidity is 0.1% and the fee for removing liquidity is 0.3%.
Advanced Order Types Available via FIX API:
Atlas 2.0 now supports trailing stops, stop limit, market, reserves, discretionary, and mid-point peg orders. Additional order types will be made available to website and Web API users in the in the next major platform upgrade.
New Multi-Signature Wallet for Improved Security: Atlas 2.0 provides a coin agnostic (support of 180 plus alt-coins), multi-signature, read-only wallet with cold storage.
Immediately following the Atlas 2.0 public launch, Atlas ATS will be adding additional alt coins over the next few weeks, and working to expedite payment services and banking services to create more options for funding trading accounts.
About Atlas ATS
Atlas is dedicated to providing a secure, state-of-the-art technology exchange platform for transacting digital currency. Atlas is driven to be an industry leader in operating a trading venue and providing innovative products and services for the benefit of the global trading community. The company believes that competition from technology-driven markets increases overall market volumes and improves performance, providing benefits to all participants.
submitted by bitcoinbravo to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

What should be our short term price goal and what will we have to do to get there?

In order to bring in the type of long term investors and develop the infrastructure for our coin to displace Bitcoin, we need a short term strategy to get us over the next hump. That strategy needs to be obtaining and keeping a market cap larger than that of NXT. That means more than doubling the current price of about 38 k, 18 cents. Thus, 80 k, 36 cents should be our short term goal, so we will have a market cap above NXT.
In order to overtake NXT, we have to be able to overtake both Namecoin and Mastercoin first. Namecoin does no see itself as a competitor of Bitcoin. It can coexist with either Bitcoin or Blackcoin AFAICT. Mastercoin is implemented on top of the Bitcoin Blockchain. I do not understand the other, real technical differences between the two; however, I think they are competitors to some extent. IMO, this would tend to make Namecoin an ally of Blackcoin. I have no idea if the Blackcoin Dev Team is planning on trying to support and encourage a Mastercoin type piggyback coin.
Therefore, our short term strategy should be to put in place and/or publicize what we are going to do to allow us to justify having a market cap larger than NXT. Of course, these include the following. I have listed them in priority order as I see them.
A. Publicize the fast transaction times for the long term and exploit them to promote the immediate implementation of BC trading pairs to allow arbitrage between exchanges.
B Publicize the fact that blackcoin is a hybrid PoW/PoS that is already 100% PoS, so it does not require the constant mopping up of the coins dumped by the miners.
C This allows for multipool mining of other PoW coins to support our coin’s price
D An aggressive implementation style without the delay required to develop the NXT bells and whistles that tend to confuse even seasoned cryptos.
E Quick development of innovative infrastructure such as the BlackCard to simplify use
F Nurture a special relationship with Shibes that could allow both communities to prosper.
Item A, fast transaction times, is our best long term argument, and getting the exchanges to implement the trading pairs is our best short term strategy.
Many cryptos see the advantage of B, a coin that is already 100 % PoS.
While NXT is a 100 % PoS coin, it is not a hybrid PoW/PoS. The initial distribution of NXT was based on the amount of bitcoins that were put up. We Blackcoiners contend that our system was fairer. However, the whole question of fairness is controversial with the answer being in the eye of the beholder. Thus, this argument will not get us much traction with NXTer’s. We need better points in our argument for why blackcoin should have a larger market cap than NXT.
NXT has a very complicated design plan combining just about every feature of the most successful altcoins. They are concentrating their effort on implementing these features.
We have already established very successful multipool mining that is supporting the price of our coin. Blackcoin has been rising since its introduction 52 days ago, while MXT is in a long term downtrend since its major rollout.
The May distribution of the BlackCard should boost the market cap, if a lot of the Blackcoiners give them as gifts to their friends. Of course this assumes that the card lives up to its advanced billing. So far there has not been news conference to demonstrate a prototype.
Many Shibes have been visiting blackcoin and many have already invested in BC. Nurturing this in the short term will is already helping improve the market cap. One poster on BitcoinTalk commented that many of the transactions lately are for small amounts. This was thought to be a good sign because it indicates that the coin is being distributed to many small holders, which probably includes a number of Doges.
Edit spelling
Edit: Corrected target price to 80 k, 36 cents.
submitted by RJSchex to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Atlas ATS Launches ‘Atlas 2.0’ Exchange Platform

Just received this in my inbox:
Atlas ATS is pleased to announce the launch of ‘Atlas 2.0’ exchange platform now supporting trading in alt coins, options for digital currency as well as an array of advanced native order types for FIX API clients. New York, NY March 22, 2014
New York based Atlas ATS Inc. has announced the launch of ‘Atlas 2.0’ on both its Hong Kong and North America based digital currency exchanges. The new platform provides trading for major alternative digital currencies, derivative products, a new multi-signature transaction wallet and a larger selection for advanced order types for clients using the FIX interface.
Atlas provides the digital-currency space with a Wall Street grade exchange platform deployed on a global, secure, low latency private network managed by Perseus Telecom.
Atlas ATS is making this preview available to existing clients ahead of the public announcement, and as a show of gratitude for support and loyalty, Atlas ATS is awarding a $10 credit to each client for the first 100 clients to place a trade in options or any of the newly available alt coins. The credit is limited to $10 per user.
All open orders on the system are being cancelled for the upgrade of the platform. Clients will need to enter new orders once the system upgrade is completed.
The following features are available immediately on newest release of Atlas 2.0
Major Alt Coins such as litecoin and namecoin:
Atlas ATS now supports three major alt coins providing more products to trade.
Digital Currency Options for bitcoin and litecoin:
Atlas ATS presently offers two types of options contracts 'Calls' and 'Puts', which confer upon the owner the right to buy and sell, respectively, the underlying crypto-currency at a set 'strike' price on a given 'expiration' date.
Fees on options trades follow the same add/remove (A.K.A: maketaker) model. The rebate earned when adding liquidity is 0.1% and the fee for removing liquidity is 0.3%.
Advanced Order Types Available via FIX API:
Atlas 2.0 now supports trailing stops, stop limit, market, reserves, discretionary, and mid-point peg orders. Additional order types will be made available to website and Web API users in the in the next major platform upgrade.
New Multi-Signature Wallet for Improved Security:
Atlas 2.0 provides a coin agnostic (support of 180 plus alt-coins), multi-signature, read-only wallet with cold storage.
Immediately following the Atlas 2.0 public launch, Atlas ATS will be adding additional alt coins over the next few weeks, and working to expedite payment services and banking services to create more options for funding trading accounts.
About Atlas ATS
Atlas is dedicated to providing a secure, state-of-the-art technology exchange platform for transacting digital currency. Atlas is driven to be an industry leader in operating a trading venue and providing innovative products and services for the benefit of the global trading community. The company believes that competition from technology-driven markets increases overall market volumes and improves performance, providing benefits to all participants.
submitted by vacantmentality to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Official press release: Telegraf.Money has issued a crypto currency for the DEBIT Coin community

Telegraf.Money, a financial instant messenger with integrated VISA/MasterCard cards, specializing in p2p-credits, money transfers from card to card, announced the release of its own cryptocurrency.
In near future, users wishing to buy a messenger cryptocurrency will be able to take part in the test sale of DEBIT Coin coins — cryptocurrency. Own cryptocurrency will help tighten Messenger users in the process of transactions between them, both financial and commercial.
To earn DEBIT Coin will be in the form of interest on decentralized loans and deposits from embedded cards, cryptocurrency mining, as well as on various services provided by community members.
The released DEBIT Coin tokens are tied to the VISA/MC cards embedded in the messenger, i.e. The holder of crypto-currency will be able to pay it off from his virtual or plastic card. Currently, the conversion rate is set by Telegraf.Money itself, then the coin value will be tied to the weighted average rate on the exchanges trading with the token. Thus, the owners of the tokens will be able to use them for purchases without cashing through the exchange.
Telegraf.Money Messenger is available on Android/iOS/Windows/MAC devices, also in the Web version.
In 3 months it is planning to integrate multi-wallet into the messenger, where participants can store any cryptocurrency (Bitcoin, any altcoins, and all ERC-20 tokens), an exchanger on the Shape Shift platform. Telegraf.Money plans to launch a messenger exchange where participants can exchange crypto-currencies among themselves, and also change them to fiat and electronic money. There are also encrypted text and audio messages, audio and video calls, group conferences, task-organizer — today people often spend their entire day in instant messengers and it is very convenient to plan there all their business with reminders. Using Telegraf.Money it will be possible to communicate, transfer money and make financial transactions with subscribers of other instant messengers: Skype, Facebook Messenger, Telegram.
A total of 1.000.000.000 (one billion) tokens are released, on the Ethereum blockchain compatible with the ERC-20 standard, ie DEBIT Coin will be able to transfer through any E-wallet a wallet that supports this standard. Https://etherscan.io/token/0x577f56a16080787323a8e4a9227c040b1c2017cd
The offer of cryptocurrency will be available to users of the messenger and their partners. The minimum purchase amount of tokens will be $10, the maximum $100.000. The payment will be accepted both through the payment cards integrated into the messenger and by popular electronic payment systems using the exchange partners and the cryptocurrencies BTC, DASH, LTC, ETH and EMC. Participants who took part in the test deposit receive a plastic card free of charge*, also for the first half year the bonus is the withdrawal of cash from the card and purchases without commission.
Each token buyer worth $500 will receive a Free DEBIT Coin Gold — a multi-currency wallet for storing up to 5 keys from the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Namecoin, Dash. Your wallets will be reliably protected from viruses, malware, and blocking. Multi-proof DEBIT Coin Gold wallet is the safest wallet for your cryptocurrency. It provides you with the best protection, so anyone who is not even familiar with the market can encrypt a person, can reliably protect their crypto assets.
What is DEBIT Coin
Token DEBIT Coin (DBC) is a decentralized cryptocurrency for performing any operations between community members, replenishing VISA/MC cards tied to the Telegraf.Money Messenger, for issuing and receiving short-term loans on the block, creating smart deposits, accepting and sending payments Between users of the messenger. The DEBIT Coin tokens are issued on the Ethereum blockchain contract. Tokens can be used for any purchases from VISA/MC cards, withdrawal of cash, international transfers to anywhere in the world, sell on the exchange, exchange offices.
Distribution of DEBIT Coin tokens
As part of the test sale, the distribution of tokens will take place for a maximum of 29 days, starting July 10, 2017, from 12:00 GMT. 10.000.000 (ten million) tokens, representing 1% of the total emissions, will be distributed according to the schedule below:
1.000.000 (one million) tokens are sold within 3 days, starting July 10 from 12:00 to GMT to July 13 11:59 GMT. The minimum value of the token is set at $0.10
1,000,000 (one million) tokens are sold for 4 days, starting July 13 from 12:00 to GMT on July 16 11:59 GMT. The minimum value of the token is set at $0.15
3.000.000 (three million) tokens are sold within 10 days, starting from July 16 from 12:00 to GMT to 26 July 11:59 GMT. The minimum cost of the token is $0.20
5.000.000 (five million) tokens are sold within 15 days, starting July 26 from 12:00 to GMT to August 10 11:59 GMT. The minimum value of the token is $0.25
At the end of each period mentioned above, a certain number of DEBIT Coin tokens will be distributed proportionally among all buyers, depending on the total amount of funds contributed (in USD on the day of allocation) made during these periods, as follows:
EXAMPLE: 1. 100 DEBIT Coin tokens are available for sale during the period. 2.Alex contributes 20 dollars, and Maria during the period makes 5 dollars. 3. A total of 25 dollars were paid for 100 DEBIT Coin tokens for this period, 1 DEBIT Coin token will be distributed for every $0.25. So Alex gets 80 DEBIT Coin tokens, and Maria gets 20 DEBIT Coin tokens.
In the event that a consignment of coins is sold before the minimum set period, this lot is added the number of coins from the next batch to the lower value, until the deadline ends, and so on.
submitted by socialcloudbank to u/socialcloudbank [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CryptoMarkets top posts from 2016-06-06 to 2017-06-06 09:10 PDT

Period: 364.73 days
Submissions Comments
Total 997 5060
Rate (per day) 2.73 13.65
Unique Redditors 561 1602
Combined Score 5890 10917

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 336 points, 46 submissions: boppie
    1. Over 200 Companies expected to join Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) over the next 2 to 3 months • ethtrader (18 points, 3 comments)
    2. ETH price explosion. Ethereum now most secure blockchain and Flippening >40% (16 points, 8 comments)
    3. Litecoin update - Price of bitcoin’s ‘lite’ brother is soaring as segwit seems imminent (15 points, 7 comments)
    4. As Bitcoin fees rise, OpenBazaar looks at altcoin payments (14 points, 0 comments)
    5. Poloniex Users Suffering From Frozen Accounts, Suspended Withdrawals, and Disabled Markets (14 points, 13 comments)
    6. Are we witnessing " the flippening" unfolding before our eyes right now? (13 points, 21 comments)
    7. Three big crypto-conferences in NYC next week (13 points, 6 comments)
    8. Wells Fargo sued for suspending Bitfinex wire transfers (12 points, 3 comments)
    9. Bitfinex's Problems Pile Up: Deposits Disabled, Withdrawals Delayed (11 points, 4 comments)
    10. ShapeShift is excited to announce that we will reveal the details and demo our new smart contract-powered platform, Prism on May 22nd during Consensus 2017 • ethereum (11 points, 2 comments)
  2. 262 points, 74 submissions: izveniklickov
    1. Litecoin Surges on Segwit Deal (9 points, 5 comments)
    2. Dash Surges by 110 Percent (8 points, 3 comments)
    3. Dash, Ether Double in Price (8 points, 5 comments)
    4. Ether Hits All-Time High (8 points, 1 comment)
    5. Namecoin, Peercoin Add to Gains (7 points, 0 comments)
    6. Peercoin and Namecoin Give Up Some Gains (7 points, 0 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Flatlines, Litecoin Still in Range (6 points, 0 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Pulled Higher, Litecoin Stable (6 points, 3 comments)
    9. Bitcoin Surges on ETF Speculation (6 points, 3 comments)
    10. Bitcoin Tide Lifts All Boats (6 points, 1 comment)
  3. 230 points, 13 submissions: TaaSfund
    1. Ethereum blockchain fund TaaS has built in-house Cryptographic Audit technology to provide transparency into cryptocurrencies investments. (22 points, 3 comments)
    2. Podcast: blockchain fund TaaS co-founders talking about its innovations and advantages. (22 points, 4 comments)
    3. Unbiased review of ethereum blockchain fund TaaS by Mr Ashley Fulks. (22 points, 4 comments)
    4. TaaS fund will cover the entire investment process with Kepler, a Bloomberg-like analytics platform. (21 points, 5 comments)
    5. Ethereum fund TaaS offers its tokens for trading starting April 28, 2017. (18 points, 3 comments)
    6. Legal status for cryptocurrency and competitors team up boost the market. (18 points, 1 comment)
    7. TaaS' speech: co-founder Konstantin Pysarenko at BlockChain Finance & Fintech China 2017, Shanghai. (18 points, 10 comments)
    8. TaaS launched its ICO, offering a new way for investors to participate in cryptocurrencies. (17 points, 3 comments)
    9. Blockchain and Bitcoin round-up: another day, another cryptocurrency. (16 points, 0 comments)
    10. TaaS incorporates Kepler Technologies in Switzerland and appoints Patrick Salm Managing Director (16 points, 0 comments)
  4. 107 points, 10 submissions: twigwam
    1. Ethereum - A Virtual Currency That Enables Transactions that Rival Bitcoins [New York Times] (26 points, 3 comments)
    2. “The Flippening” & How I Learned to Stop Loving Bitcoin (22 points, 0 comments)
    3. Storj to Migrate Decentralized Storage Service to Ethereum Blockchain! (13 points, 0 comments)
    4. Post-Bitcoin Technology Has Geeks, Giants, and Hackers Excited [Bloomberg] (11 points, 1 comment)
    5. Kraken opens Dash trading (9 points, 1 comment)
    6. “I’m not worried about Bitcoin Unlimited, but I am losing sleep over Ethereum” @TuurDemeester (9 points, 5 comments)
    7. Basic Attention Tokens can take Ethereum to the mainstream (8 points, 0 comments)
    8. Reddit's Co-founder is Bullish on ETH (6 points, 0 comments)
    9. Tokenization in the Age of Blockchain (2 points, 1 comment)
    10. Garzik has Flipped! (1 point, 1 comment)
  5. 102 points, 6 submissions: drewshaver
    1. Review of 5 cryptocurrency exchanges -- Poloniex, Bittrex, Kraken, Liqui, and Gemini (64 points, 13 comments)
    2. A brief comparison of hardware wallets Nano S and Trezor (18 points, 11 comments)
    3. A list of the different sectors in crypto and the projects in each, in no particular order (11 points, 10 comments)
    4. Whenever DASH ramps, XMR and SDC ramp about 3-7 days later (4 points, 5 comments)
    5. Just received incredible support from Liqui.io (3 points, 4 comments)
    6. Historically speaking, when BTC/USD rises a lot, do alts generally hold their price or fall against BTC? (2 points, 0 comments)
  6. 98 points, 3 submissions: fomoer
    1. I made almost US$400k overnight. (40 points, 44 comments)
    2. So I've decided to invest US$2 million in a crypto portfolio. (36 points, 104 comments)
    3. $2mil portfolio: An update, and my top three picks this month (22 points, 39 comments)
  7. 77 points, 2 submissions: Mlawless
    1. Hey I should really invest in this crypto stuff everyone's buzzing about (76 points, 18 comments)
    2. What's up with NewYorkCoin and where can I get some (1 point, 5 comments)
  8. 71 points, 1 submission: KalpaX
    1. How to become a Crypto Millionaire in 6 Months or Less (71 points, 40 comments)
  9. 65 points, 5 submissions: homm88
    1. Disclosure of a Major Bug in CryptoNote Based Currencies (Bytecoin, DashCoin, DigitalNote affected) (37 points, 6 comments)
    2. Ethereum for Investors - a must watch for anyone still learning about ETH (10 points, 1 comment)
    3. The Book of Wolong - insight into the mind of a pump-and-dump artist (7 points, 4 comments)
    4. Bitfinex CSO Comments on Litigation Withdrawl (6 points, 0 comments)
    5. The land grab • ethtrader (5 points, 0 comments)
  10. 62 points, 1 submission: devilsadvocado
    1. What are the top 10 cryptocurrencies to invest in over the next 12 months? (62 points, 77 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. boppie (450 points, 192 comments)
  2. KalpaX (152 points, 53 comments)
  3. cryptodude12345 (109 points, 61 comments)
  4. drewshaver (109 points, 49 comments)
  5. ArrayBoy (96 points, 34 comments)
  6. antiprosynthesis (94 points, 34 comments)
  7. isrly_eder (94 points, 28 comments)
  8. CuckedByTRUMP (78 points, 3 comments)
  9. xor2g (72 points, 38 comments)
  10. metaperl (70 points, 46 comments)
  11. Mirved (69 points, 10 comments)
  12. CouvePT (68 points, 13 comments)
  13. Deaf_null (67 points, 15 comments)
  14. rem123lbc (64 points, 61 comments)
  15. fomoer (62 points, 26 comments)
  16. kerne1_pan1c (61 points, 1 comment)
  17. Fosforus (60 points, 18 comments)
  18. joskye (59 points, 18 comments)
  19. homm88 (58 points, 20 comments)
  20. oarabbus (57 points, 25 comments)
  21. OIIOIIOIIO (55 points, 22 comments)
  22. earthmoonsun (55 points, 18 comments)
  23. ohiomoonchild (51 points, 17 comments)
  24. ZephyrPro (49 points, 9 comments)
  25. observerc (48 points, 21 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Hey I should really invest in this crypto stuff everyone's buzzing about by Mlawless (76 points, 18 comments)
  2. How to become a Crypto Millionaire in 6 Months or Less by KalpaX (71 points, 40 comments)
  3. Review of 5 cryptocurrency exchanges -- Poloniex, Bittrex, Kraken, Liqui, and Gemini by drewshaver (64 points, 13 comments)
  4. What are the top 10 cryptocurrencies to invest in over the next 12 months? by devilsadvocado (62 points, 77 comments)
  5. Made a little bot for finding favorable trading conditions on Poloniex (really simple machine learning) by thenewboston (56 points, 30 comments)
  6. You have been given $10,000 by drcopperfield (54 points, 65 comments)
  7. Diversify intelligently, not haphazardly. Crypto diversification is about spreading your money across multiple economic models, multiple codebases, and multiple consensus algorithms so that one problem with one thing doesn't wipe you out. by slowmoon (43 points, 35 comments)
  8. I made almost US$400k overnight. by fomoer (40 points, 44 comments)
  9. Disclosure of a Major Bug in CryptoNote Based Currencies (Bytecoin, DashCoin, DigitalNote affected) by homm88 (37 points, 6 comments)
  10. So I've decided to invest US$2 million in a crypto portfolio. by fomoer (36 points, 104 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 71 points: CuckedByTRUMP's comment in You have been given $10,000
  2. 61 points: kerne1_pan1c's comment in What are some of the most under the radar or undervalued coins with an outlook of 2+ years?
  3. 39 points: HeyZeusChrist's comment in So I've decided to invest US$2 million in a crypto portfolio.
  4. 38 points: bjorneylol's comment in So I've decided to invest US$2 million in a crypto portfolio.
  5. 27 points: stereoagnostic's comment in Did the bubble just burst?
  6. 26 points: Mirved's comment in $2mil portfolio: An update, and my top three picks this month
  7. 25 points: cyclicamp's comment in How to become a Crypto Millionaire in 6 Months or Less
  8. 24 points: cHaTrU's comment in So I've decided to invest US$2 million in a crypto portfolio.
  9. 23 points: Budwiser86's comment in What is your alt coin trading strategies?
  10. 23 points: cakemuncher's comment in Did the bubble just burst?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

My thought on Bitcoin in the Beltway after Sunday

Continuation of previous topic.
So today was a shorter day. I missed some presentation times since I was preparing for my own panel.
I attended a part of the "Digital Currencies vs. the Empire". Early on Angela Keaton was sharing her stories about how government was illegally surveying her Antiwar.com company.
I couldn't stay for the whole talk as I wanted to catch the Maidsafe presentation. Unfortunately, that was a waste as they were a no-show. Oh well.
Afterwards I attended "Fear Not the Silk Road" by Kristov Atlas. He talked about Silk Road decreasing the amount of violent crimes, as well as empowering anyone to make their own business using highly-anonymous technoligies, such as Open Bazaar. All in all, soon relatively cheap technologies will be able to empower the people in oppressive regimes.
Next up, Chris Odom of Open Transactions talked about his project. He and his team moved to Switzerland to be able to develop truly free software. The platform is gaining more and more features as they integrate more and more elements from Namecoin and Bitmessage. The talk was really brief and to the point.
The next talk I attended was on "Bitcoin in Space" by Jeff Garzik, where he talked about putting small cubesat satellites onto low earth orbit and using them to put full Bitcoin nodes in space. This would allow anyone around the world be able to synchronize their clients even in an event of local Internet being shut down. It really looks like an interesting project, even if the practical applications might be limited.
The main presentation of the day was "How Blockchain Technology Can Mend the Broken Nonprofit Sector" by M.K. Lords, Andreas, Davi Barker and Jason King, where they talked about nonprofits and Bitcoin. Overall, the consensus is that it is easier for nonprofits to accept Bitcoin donations than credit card donations, but despite that there are few Bitcoin charities. A number of charities are also skewing their mission statement to be in line with some grant requirements. Andreas jokingly suggested that if Jason redefined his mission statement from feeding the homeless of Pensacola, to "dropping food onto homeless from planes in Pensacolastan", he would get a lot of government funding ;). It was also mentioned that Bitcoin might be an only option for some charities to even exist - for example if you have a charity for women in oppressed countries where it is impossible for them to even have bank accounts, they have no other way of receiving donations. All in all, Bitcoin is a great solution for the charities.
The day concluded with a talk by me and David Lowy on "The Singularity of Money" replacing Cody Wilson that couldn't make it today. We talked about how in the future the currency won't matter, only the value. Instead of seeing a single world currency, we will probably be seeing a number of easily exchangeable currencies being used. Crypto 2.0 systems will be integral in making this happen.
Overall, the day was less eventful than yesterday, probably because a lot of people have already left to attend a conference in China. It was still interesting.
submitted by ThePiachu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Ethereum Thoughts and Questions

I will be at the Miami conference, and I will consider investing if my questions have reasonable answers. Illegal contracts are particularly concerning to me.
NECESSITY OF A NEW BLOCKCHAIN
The whitepaper states that colored coins inherit the same limitations as the bitcoin protocol. Metacoins do not, but they cannot be truly secure without having a copy of the blockchain. How big of a problem is this? Hasn't the Electrum model worked for Bitcoin? Is there a big issue with just querying a bunch of supernodes to see if they all give the same result? Is it necessary to have absolute security with every contract, or only very high value transactions? Is it correct that metacoin clients won't need the first 14gb of the blockchain?
BITCOIN BLOCKCHAIN SIZE
Bitcoin Magazine's analysis showed that since storage capacity and internet bandwidth follow Moore's law, the blockchain size will not be a problem to store on phones. How many years from now should we predict that the blockchain size will become irrelevant? If the blockchain size were irrelevant, would that remove the need for ethereum? How much demand is there for blockchain contracts at this time, and how fast should we expect demand to accelerate?
ETHEREUM BLOCKCHAIN
How fast should we estimate the ethereum blockchain size will grow? What will be the effects of ethereum blockchain size growth several orders of magnitude greater than Bitcoin? Will this lead to more mining centralisation?
TURING COMPLETENESS
Is it reasonable to think the client can be sandboxed? What will be the effects of these, since the protocol is Turing complete: viruses, malware, adware, keyloggers, scam contracts, wallet stealers
ILLEGAL CONTRACTS
What will be the effects of illegal contracts? An assassination market, for example? Will the Silk Road be able to run on ethereum? Will a database of child porn be able to be stored? If there is child porn stored on the blockchain that is easily accessible, will it be legal to store the blockchain in any country? What will be the effects of running all the clients over Tor by default? Can a 60s block time with huge blocks work over Tor?
SATOSHI'S ARGUMENTS
In 2010, satoshi succesfully argued against including Namecoin into bitcoin, suggesting merge-mining instead.
 "Piling every proof-of-work quorum system in the world into one dataset doesn't scale. Bitcoin and BitDNS can be used separately. Users shouldn't have to download all of both to use one or the other. BitDNS users may not want to download everything the next several unrelated networks decide to pile in either. The networks need to have separate fates. BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices." -- Satoshi 
You can view the rest of his arguments in the thread here: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1790.0;all
DEVELOPER COMMENTS
I have not seen any core bitcoin developers comment on ethereum. Is there somewhere besides the reddit and the thread on bitcointalk about it?
I am not very technical, so sorry if some of my questions are invalid or stated incorrectly.
submitted by SethOtterstad to ethereum [link] [comments]

Atlas ATS Launches Atlas 2.0 and now allows litecoin trading.

Atlas ATS is pleased to announce the launch of ‘Atlas 2.0’ exchange platform now supporting trading in alt coins, options for digital currency as well as an array of advanced native order types for FIX API clients. New York, NY March 22, 2014 New York based Atlas ATS Inc. has announced the launch of ‘Atlas 2.0’ on both its Hong Kong and North America based digital currency exchanges.
The new platform provides trading for major alternative digital currencies, derivative products, a new multi-signature transaction wallet and a larger selection for advanced order types for clients using the FIX interface.
Atlas provides the digital-currency space with a Wall Street grade exchange platform deployed on a global, secure, low latency private network managed by Perseus Telecom.
Atlas ATS is making this preview available to existing clients ahead of the public announcement, and as a show of gratitude for support and loyalty, Atlas ATS is awarding a $10 credit to each client for the first 100 clients to place a trade in options or any of the newly available alt coins. The credit is limited to $10 per user. All open orders on the system are being cancelled for the upgrade of the platform. Clients will need to enter new orders once the system upgrade is completed.
The following features are available immediately on newest release of Atlas 2.0
Major Alt Coins such as litecoin and namecoin: Atlas ATS now supports three major alt coins providing more products to trade. Digital Currency Options for bitcoin and litecoin:
Atlas ATS presently offers two types of options contracts 'Calls' and 'Puts', which confer upon the owner the right to buy and sell, respectively, the underlying crypto-currency at a set 'strike' price on a given 'expiration' date. Fees on options trades follow the same add/remove (A.K.A: maketaker) model. The rebate earned when adding liquidity is 0.1% and the fee for removing liquidity is 0.3%.
Advanced Order Types Available via FIX API: Atlas 2.0 now supports trailing stops, stop limit, market, reserves, discretionary, and mid-point peg orders. Additional order types will be made available to website and Web API users in the in the next major platform upgrade. New Multi-Signature Wallet for Improved Security:
Atlas 2.0 provides a coin agnostic (support of 180 plus alt-coins), multi-signature, read-only wallet with cold storage. Immediately following the Atlas 2.0 public launch, Atlas ATS will be adding additional alt coins over the next few weeks, and working to expedite payment services and banking services to create more options for funding trading accounts. About Atlas ATS
Atlas is dedicated to providing a secure, state-of-the-art technology exchange platform for transacting digital currency. Atlas is driven to be an industry leader in operating a trading venue and providing innovative products and services for the benefit of the global trading community. The company believes that competition from technology-driven markets increases overall market volumes and improves performance, providing benefits to all participants.
[EDIT - THEY HAVEN'T MADE THE PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT YET, THIS IS AN EMAIL SENT TO CURRENT EXCHANGE USERS]
submitted by karljt to litecoin [link] [comments]

Pro-Dogecoin, Pro-Life: Fundraiser for Pro-Life Conference

Are you pro-dogecoin? Are you pro-life? Yale’s pro-life club, Choose Life at Yale (CLAY), is raising money to put on its second annual weekend pro-life conference happening this September 19-20. We had a great first conference in October 2013 (check it out at lifeandtruth2013.com/details) and raised a lot of awareness about the intellectual underpinnings of the pro-life movement on a mostly pro-choice campus. We are hoping to hire some well known speakers to attract a larger audience and show everyone that all freedom loving and compassionate people should be pro-life.
We are hoping to raise $40,000 to pay for speaker’s fees, accommodations, transportation, publicity, and a pro-life reception. I know how generous the crypto community can be and, if we raise more money than our goal, all excess donations will be donated to pro-life organizations!
Wow! Pls Send:
DTPHRdy7HjsaMkV57UYz3vTufUyKe5Ret3
~~~~~~~~~~~
We are also accepting donations for other coins too!
Bitcoin: 1BLaqnUzNJXBwUSXHjh6cwjTsjJfEEYMqd
Litecoin: LcZ5THzxuZg532tE6aEXsfXSgguu6VivjZ
Peercoin: PBjdXHfmrbUh4YQBHKYcctw6WT5kxNtXmw
Ripple: rDTWib2skYCrVHRT3XxtEKfrc3SBz7bpwk
Feathercoin: 6wRf8Wqg3zMuT4hnMSiybUp5zH5qgMLScA
Namecoin: N5KigY17g5vrHqXm4q9ebyLToxjQbCHppz
Primecoin: AeDNiKJyaW4YspC8GnSAVzNZU1PLtvnw1o
submitted by LifeandTruth to dogecoin [link] [comments]

What the Cryptocurrency Boom Missed: The NameCoin Story What is NAMECOIN BITCOIN'S First Fork - YouTube Namecoin is Useful, but Bitcoin Buys Guns!  PNN Live #60 Critical Decentralisation Cluster 36c3 - Namecoin Introduction (Jeremy Rand) What is Namecoin?

Clockwise from top left: Litecoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Namecoin and bitcoin. The wider acceptance of bitcoin and cryptocurrency means that other emerging competitors to the original technology are gaining traction in the marketplace. and these funds may pay for anything from hiring additional developers, attending conferences and integrations To hear Daniel Kraft, the lead engineer of Namecoin, say it – “Bitcoin frees money, Namecoin frees DNS, identities, and other information”. Namecoin is the second oldest cryptocurrency after Bitcoin, but it is more than that. It builds a naming system that is decentralised, trustless, secure and has human-readable names. Joseph works on porting Bitcoin software to Namecoin, and also specializes in reproducible builds. Outside of Namecoin, he has done development work relating to Bitcoin wallet software, the Gitian reproducible build tool (his contributions are primarily used by The Tor Project), and the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Namecoin – the dark web coin Acts as an alternative, decentralized Domain Name System (DNS). Avoids domain name seizure and or censorship by making a new top level domain outside of ICANN control. Has suffered from significant technical problems. 84... Namecoin is the very first of all the altcoins — I know, you heard it was Litecoin. It’s not. The specs are going to be very easy to go over, so I’ll start there: – Identical to Bitcoin for block time, reward, total coins, etc. – Fair, open-source, public release on April 18, 2011 by an anonymous founder, “vinced” – BitcoinTalk Announcement – Website – Forum – Wiki

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What the Cryptocurrency Boom Missed: The NameCoin Story

Have you ever wondered what goes on at a major Bitcoin Conference, and what is involved. Who are the people that make up these conferences, what is involved, and how does everything come together. Namecoin is a blockchain (first project forked from Bitcoin) that implements a decentralized DNS and public key infrastructure, which is resistant to censorship, hijacking, and other tampering. Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss Gemini brothers: Exchange, Finance, Bitcoin, BTC, Investments 2020 Dr. Sameer Islam, MD 25,012 watching Live now Don't Talk to the Police - Duration: 46:39. Hosts of RT Channel's, Episode 3 (Permissionless) ,"To the Moon" show, Stacy Herbert and Max Keiser, discuss Bitcoin and its rise to popularity. In it, Simon Dixon is featured. In the segment ... Namecoin (ℕ or NMC) is Bitcoin's First Altcoin - The cryptocurrency for decentralized .BIT domains.

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