Countries Where Bitcoin Is Legal & Illegal (DISH, OTSK)

Under Secretary for terrorism and financial intelligence wants federal banking laws applied to bitcoin

Under Secretary for terrorism and financial intelligence wants federal banking laws applied to bitcoin submitted by coinyel_lol to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Washington state will be unable to collect taxes on its newly legal cannabis sales through the traditional banking system because of federal law. What if they were to accept Bitcoin?

Washington state will be unable to collect taxes on its newly legal cannabis sales through the traditional banking system because of federal law. What if they were to accept Bitcoin? submitted by NixPhenom to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Federal law prohibits commercial banks to deal with "illegal drug" sales in Colorado; cash only. Why isn't Bitcoin being used?

http://www.denverpost.com/marijuana/ci_24805239/state-owned-bank-wont-work-marijuana-cash
submitted by JEdwardSal to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Janet Yellen: Federal Reserve has no authority to regulate Bitcoin. Federal Reserve chair told banking committee regulators confident US law is ‘adequate to meet enforcement needs’.

submitted by zorro24 to znews [link] [comments]

Selling bitcoin on Localbitcoins - Bank, Tax, and Federal Law Implications?

From what I've read its not 'illegal' to sell coins on localbitcoins. Clearly people are doing it as there's plenty of active listings in Canada as I type this.
My initial thought was that accepting interac e-transfers would be the best route to go, but reading further it seems that scammers can claim the transaction was fraudulent and result in my account being frozen and an investigation taking place... Doesn't sound too fun.
Are there ways to prevent this, or to at least protect yourself if a transaction does get reported fraudulent?
What about cash deposits? Also seems popular and relatively risk free? I wouldn't think a scammer could come back later and say that the cash he deposited was fraudulent...
Obviously either payment method will lead to a lot of cash/e-transfer deposits. Has anyone had their account frozen or investigated for this? Is this something to worry about?
Would it be beneficial to split proceeds to multiple banks to keep individual bank deposits lower to avoid raising any eyebrows?
I know that any sales need to be reported as capital gains to the CRA, but is there anything else to consider with regards to federal law? Limits to how much I can sell before having to do something else? Reporting to FINTRAC or some other government body, etc.?
submitted by microcompass to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Bitcoin challenged my comprehension of money. and from that, governance too

Social Media hacking jokes aside for today, I thought to share a thought experiment I had on how bitcoin fundamentally challenged the way I view money forever.
I was always told throughout life and even in school that money distributed by the government, managed by the government, but used amount the populus. It wasn't until I was 17 in my senior year where I learned about the in-depth concepts of money with topics such as Federal Reserve Banking (How banks make money), taxes, debt, and fiscal and monetary economy. What's funnier is that when I was 14 I heard about bitcoin, but I thought it was just an idea for some far off technology like Nuclear Fusion or Astro mining. So I'm happy to state I learned more about bitcoin before I learned about my own government monetary system. Unfortunately, It would not be for another 2 years before I learn about cryptocurrency and blockchain entirely and another few months before I can actually buy some.
It was at the moment when I fully understood the concepts of bitcoin where I fell in love with it, the idea that NO government, company, or bank could just step in and take your money. No overdrafts, chargebacks, or no 3-5 days deposits. It is great. I get excited to the point I share all I can to people around me about the concept and yet they are confused like a child learning a new language because the concept of true financial responsibility and digital sovereignty can be complex to comprehend. Many of them refer to the same statements: "Money should be protected and held by the bank so I trust that it will forever be there". As I think of it more I start to think of ways how blockchain technology as a whole can be implemented into fintech (or even become the new fintech). Henry Ford once said that
" It is well enough that people of the nation do not understand our banking and monetary system, for if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning."
It is merely with the introduction of bitcoin and decentralized finance tools when this quote incubates into fruition. Cryptocurrency as a whole puts the individual in power with the same banking tools as the whole banking collective operates on. I agree that there are many people who are fed up with the banks, and their practices but at the same time those people are even more scared to assume their own financial control due to immense responsibilities the bitcoin introduces (private key, cognitive understanding of the industry and tech). Yes, banks are here to provide a service to the public ease and use, but therein lies the question of how much freedom do people really want when they realize that they are also baring even more responsibilities than they are used to. Great power comes with great responsibility. The more financial freedom (I'm not talking about in dollar amounts, but security and accessibility ) you have over your wealth the more responsibility is needed to maintain it. So then more so this brings furthermore changed my perception that I don't have to be so reliant on centralized parties with my money, but I can own my money on the blockchain and send it anywhere where in the world as I deem fit.
So this brings to my thoughts of how would blockchain systems work in government and laws. The laws are barely adapted to handle the internet as is; now they are further behind to handle blockchain. With coronavirus going around this is a testament to show how we are becoming stronger digital society. I have not been out of my home in the past few days, and most of the older ways of doing things are becoming challenged with the introduction of new technologies. The only thing that defines our governments are the lands in which was founded, discovered, or concurred by winning factions and ideals that ultimately curated most of the cultures we see today. We can speak to anyone we can on the internet in a matter of seconds, make a full-time living, we can buy nearly anything and get it delivered on the same day or week, and be associated with communities that align with our interest all online. So when these apps have more data and international relations than the governments we reside, can governments be more than just "land"?
Finally, this brings into question Facebook and Libra. Facebook is one of the largest public multi-national countries on this planet, and libra in eyes of many just a software update. However, Libra shined a light on so many things I've always wondered. With as powerful as Facebook is that probably knows more about you than your government, and has more international relationships with more countries than your government, if/whenever libra is released, this now puts a corporate entity in charge of your money. And As they say, libra existing on blockchains, really can't be stopped if ever it's released. Sure governments can be banned and sue Facebook all they want, but if there are people using it, the damage is done, they can't shut down Facebook without causing an economic collapse probably one worse than the great depression. Facebook is just too big to fail. Google, Amazon are other companies seeking to challenge governance by cities for their corporate entities and employees. They most likely won't be here in the USA too much regulation, but someone where like Africa or even cities on water .
All in all, as I leave, Everything I knew about finances such as mortgages, paychecks, loans, mediums of exchange, trade, and banking tools are all fundamentally challenged by the introduction of bitcoin. The power lies in those who own the system, and when no one owns the system, but everyone manages it, the real power becomes invested back into the people. With this knowledge, I know that I am truly more powerful than I thought I was, and you should feel empowered as well. Sure the infrastructure may take time before things become convenient enough for wide-scale adoption, but we are the founding fathers and mothers of the first generation in the true power of decentralized tech. We are the ones that decide on how the first implementation of this tech should be used, and that's all by experimentation. I agree that it will be a daunting task and scary for those who are not familiar with this. Like all things that exist it starts with experimentation.
submitted by tycooperaow to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My stock study watchlist. would appreciate criticisms or red flags

Core
- FB ecosystem
This is the stock that i believe is invested in the right places and has a path forward in the global market. I work as a React developer in fintech and I greatly enjoy their technology. The reason I stopped using snapchat was because I couldn't use it on low connection in Mexico, but Instagram worked marvelously. I use Whatsapp to stay in touch with my family in mexico and Facebook to stay in touch with my mom. There's something extremely powerful about that in my opinion.
They're conservative with their push and development of camera and VR technology which is wise in my opinion give the many opportunities that exist in that space. They're pushing along with fintech in India, again with small business through Whatsapp. And they provide a suite of customer services for small business and entrepeneurs.

- Microsoft
I think they will have a great run during the cloud era of software development. Their acquiring of Github AND NPM goes to show how in touch they are with developer servicing.

- Paypal
Paypal has a marvelous history and is a battle tested pioneer in the fintech space. I see them repeating their previous successes by acquiring Honey. I work with Honey in the fintech space and now I'm understanding that Paypal has an auto coupon scraper on my Amazon purchases while my Visa ones don't. This is the forward thinking I love from Paypal despite not being as flashy as Square.

- Disney
Disney is quintessential american entertainment. I believe their deep roots in American culture and the entertainment industry will provide a solid bedrock for them for the generations to come.

- Waste Management
Sanitation and environmental, like internet connection technology, are about the same when it comes to market penetration. It is a scarcity. Sanitation is a critical part of any society's development and wellbeing. I think WM will be there to benefit from increased urbanization and industriousness from technology and wealth growth.

- Kansas City Southern
I'm Mexican and my family are avocado farmers. I believe in the future prospects of Mexico and its relationship with its neighbors. Mexico is a bustling nation and many youth are international students that carry degrees. This is a far cry from having military policing streets in rural neighborhoods decades ago. Kansas city southern is part of the supply chain that connects Mexico to main industrious Mexican states like Monterrey, Jalisco, and Michaocan. I like rail in this regard because it's a lot of weight in one operation of heavy materials. So Canadians that use Mexican mining will also benefit from this railroad.
- Nintendo
I believe in the future of gaming as a market and if I were to take a shot at who would be the most stable, I would vote for Nintendo. Like Facebook, they approach the family unit and grow generationally. I love their curveball approach to gaming and I think that creativity, along with it's customers trust, will be something I can hold onto for a long time versus companies that have a history of developing games like Call of Duty or World of Warcraft. Nintendo can take different forms: in the living room, at sweaty tournaments, online, mobile, on your phone, on a TV, in the movies, etc.

Closely watching
- United Health or Cigna
This is only going to grow and wont change due to American politics for 8 years at a minimum.
- Cisco
Same as Microsoft but for IT.
- Impossible Foods IPO
I've been vegetarian for 10 years and Impossible Burgers has been one of the most mindblowing experiences of my life. The product is phenomenal and on a league of its owned compared to Beyond Meat. IMHO Beyond taste like cheap school lunchroom burgers and Impossible tastes like something I would be excited to feed my family. If their pork products are great then I am ALL in because Chicken products are by far the easiest thing to replicate. I'm extremely excited about this product.
- Visa
They make a ton of money on transactions. I saw them hiring for blockchain development so it leads me to believe that they're adapting.
- Square
I work in the fintech space and I like their modest approach to financial services. Their acquiring of a bank charter is actually incredibly important due to all the procurement and legal processes that go behind being a fintech company (abiding by federal security laws, etc). The one reason I like Chase banking is because I enjoy their app. I see Square as a competitor to Chase, surprisingly.
- Apple
Apple designs its products with customer service in mind. I think the future of education technology will likely go to Apple because of this. Their screens and cameras are wonderful and I can see them pioneering computer vision products because of this. They are THE American Tech company.
- TMobile
Aggressive as hell and grew to be a large player through savvy moves across time. Their customer service is a highlight for me.
- JPM
Customer service for banking is unmatched IMO. If any legacy banker will make it across changes, I believe Chase is doing what it takes to adapt and think forward.
- Planet Fitness
$10 gyms, clean, and casual enough for the general population. You can't beat $10 gym membership when you're broke as fuck. I've been a heavy lifter before and still used Planet fitness in my transitions across states and whatnot. I need to look at their numbers more closely.
- Volkwagen
I trust Europe and Japan to take EVs more seriously. I don't know who will seriously come close to competing with Tesla in the long run but they'll have to.
- Panasonic
Panasonic, much like AMD, did not immediately reflect the value of what they have produced. AMD did not explode inline with bitcoin or cheaper GPU consumption, in the same way Panasonic did not reflect a massive spike in price after speculation in Tesla grew. They're an important arm to the EV market that spreads across many players ranging from Tesla to Toyota to big tech.

- Lyft
I think Lyft's focus on customer service and regional clientele will pay off against Uber, who is growing too quickly and spreading thin. Lyft will benefit from the development of computer vision and Big tech's interest in automanufacturing.

- Crypto (Bitcoin or XRP)
I like crypto as a technology as a software engineer. I see the value in a faster process for procuring and exchanging legal tender that does not have to go through the bottleneck of the ACH process or through legal issues like the PATRIOT ACT or the Bank Secrecy Act. It still fundamentally respects those laws without the frustrations of banking service bottlenecks. I think the halvening protocol has an interesting affect on Bitcoin and supply and the market that it's trying to generate.







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submitted by codingprofessor to investing [link] [comments]

What if we just start our own Federal Reserve Bank?

I was doing some DD and came across these 2 legal cases:
In United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation v. Western Union Telegraph Co.,[5] the U.S. Supreme Court stated, "Instrumentalities like the national banks or the federal reserve banks, in which there are private interests, are not departments of the government. They are private corporations in which the government has an interest."
and
In Lewis v. United States,[7] the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit stated that: "The Reserve Banks are not federal instrumentalities for purposes of the FTCA [the Federal Tort Claims Act], but are independent, privately owned and locally controlled corporations."
So since the Federal Reserve is a private corporation and doesn't seem to have a copyright to the name (since there are already 12 of these things). What if we just start our own? Then we can buy one of those brand new money printers everyone talks so much about instead of wasting our money on puts!
TLDR: Federal reserve is a private company. Start our own Federal Reserve of WSB. Purchase money printer. Profit???
submitted by wannabecameraguy to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Feds seize $181,000 from trucker at Tampa airport. His company says 'something is fishy.': "The lawsuit says it's common to pay cash for big rigs and the money the employee was carrying was legitimate." [United States of America]

Feds seize $181,000 from trucker at Tampa airport. His company says 'something is fishy.': submitted by trot-trot to economy [link] [comments]

QUADRIGA 2.0 = COINBERRY?

TL;DR- A "Canadian" crypto exchange has been blowing off customers while their accounts and funds are frozen. Their company isn't trading in Canada, their PR hlooks grandiose but in fact isn't impressive at all, and they are now lying to customers about the reason for the delays.
FULL BREAKDOWN
Coinberry uses "trusted by the Canadian Government" as their main call-to-action and as leverage to gain your business due to their partnership with two municipalities (Richmond Hill and Innisfil township) Townships are NOT part of the Canadian Federal Government, they are municipalities. Municipalities are autonomous. The Canadian federal government and LOCAL government aren't the same thing, that is fraudulent representation.
The mayor of Innisfil has been known to accept gifts from companies trying to get in his favour. Only 5% of CANADIANS- not Innisfil residents, hold cryptocurrency. So, in a town of 36K people, where the majority of the population is 50+ in age, how many are likely to hold bitcoin? Coinberry is the only one benefiting from this; they get to say they've partnered with a township, and if anyone actually wanted to pay property tax in Bitcoin then they need to sign up with Coinberry.
The special information package tells Innisfil residents that "Coinberry has fully supportive, transparent and CDIC insured segregated banking in Canada (page 2/26) A quick Google search will tell you that's false - the CDIC does NOT cover digital currencies as of April 30th, 2020. The document linked stating this was made in 2019. How much did this mayor get paid to lie to his citizens?! I doubt he'd do it for free.
They leverage being PIPEDA compliant, yet all you need is a self assessment tool. It's based on opinion, yet it's their first selling point. It's a garbage selling point that gives false confidence to potential clients.
FINTRAC REGISTRY AND THEIR SHELL COMPANY IN MALTA
They claim to be the only FINTRAC registered company. Nope. A quick search of other crypto exchanges in the FINTRAC lookup proves that claim wrong: https://www10.fintrac-canafe.gc.ca/msb-esm/public/msb-search/search-by-name/
Their privacy policy mentions a parent company. Their parent company is listed on FINTRAC as CB INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, and is based in Malta. For those of you who aren't aware, Malta is well known for being the best place to set up shell companies in order to avoid taxes and protect CEOs from lawsuits after "their" money. This was NOT the case for Kraken, Newton or Shakepay. Only Coinberry feels they need a shell company in another country.
They have 4 companies listed, all Coinberry. All 4 listings show Coinberrys agent activities listed as money transferring, and 2 of them are listed as agents of CB INTERNATIONAL LIMITED (the parent company). This parent company is located in Malta and has listed its activities as foreign exchange and money transferring. This means all of the exchanges happening are actually happening in MALTA not Canada.
They seem to be the only exchange (with Canadian HQ) doing this: Kraken, Newton and Shakepay list their agent activities as foreign exchange dealing, and all are registered IN CANADA. This implies your money is also staying in Canada on their platforms.
Where there is smoke, there is fire.
edit: added a TL;DR, took out unnecessary sentences, cleaned up wording. I was pissed when I wrote this. I just want to see Coinberry suits come clean about the delays. Tell people why you can't get their money back as soon as you said you would, because this only making crypto even scarier for new adopters.
submitted by cosmicariel to Scams [link] [comments]

Consortium>Elite>Fed/Bankers>Military Industrial Complex>Corporate Industries>Rulers>Media, Entertainment>Workers>Children>Retired, Disabled, Sick, Unemployed

Are you ready to really wake up? Then you must fathom the nature of our peril, and the plots against us. Understanding the state of the world today begins with understanding the pecking order, and how far down we are in both power and freedom. Though many people live under the illusion that we are all equal, nothing could be further from the truth. Let me describe each level of their pyramid power structure.
CONSORTIUM
The Consortium exploits the minor differences between us: race, religion, sex, age, and nationality, in order to separate us and keep us from working together against them. It is a false choice, because we are ALL humans. We all live under the thumb of a hidden Consortium full of many species of aliens profiting off of us in every way.
We have spoken here and on the reptiliandude forum about these aliens at length. The main points to realize is that they have been with us all along, influencing and manipulating, they live for thousands of our years and are a million years ahead of us. It seems pretty bleak, yet we have alien allies who help us and the One God who loves us and intercedes on our behalf, so that gives us hope. There are about a million of them, but 7.5 billion of us. They have the tech, we have the numbers. And if we quit letting them turn us against one another for scraps tossed from their table, we just might win.
ELITE
The elite are a combination of well positioned humans and mentally overwritten ones puppeted by the Kayeen. Each year, more and more elderly and dying Kayeen lying in vats on their home planets cherry pick humans to wear like a suit. By using particle entanglement to overwrite infants in utero, their memories are gradually activated until the child is fully overwritten. They also try to cut corners and overwrite adults at times, but the older the humans are, the less effective it is. Dementia, death or schizophrenia can result when they detach. These wealthy elites leave trust funds of their money to their children and grandchildren, and detach and overwrite subsequent generations when the bodies they use wear out.
The well positioned humans are usually wealthy, educated at elite universities, part of secret societies, foundations, and leading international financial institutions. They are invite only groups who congregate on islands, compounds, bunkers and resorts to get their marching orders from the Consortium. These elite are typically sociopaths picked from childhood and groomed. They had powerful mentors.
These elite are bribed with sexual temptations, like pedophilia, financial rewards and power. In exchange, they sign do not disclose agreements and in effect, sell out humanity, even lead in the efforts to manipulate, experiment, exploit or kill us. If they waiver, they are threatened, as are their families. Sex tapes are filmed of illegal or humiliating encounters that could destroy the reputations of the elite if made public, so they comply.
FED/BANKERS
The Federal Reserve, International Monetary Fund, Foundations, Internatuonal Banks, Financial Consultants and Intetnational Investment Firms are the most powerful corporations in the world. They have pushed for the new world order in order to lump us all together and dependent on them for all monies. They seek deregulation, monopolization and government backed security for their greedy international schemes. Trillions of dollars has been forked over to them, especially in times of war or crisis, payable by future taxpayers. When Covid hit, banks were paid FIRST.
They are not required to give much in the way of accountability. Their shareholders profit before their customers do. And when they make completely risky loans, they are bailed out by taxpayers. They win if we win and they win if we lose. Either way, none of them ever go to jail for their wrong doings since they are protected by the elite.
Their goal is to profit no matter what, control the masses through a digital currency they can freeze or remove from bank accounts at will. Contagions on dollars will be the excuse to go digital federally, then internationally. If we accept this, we will be chipped to participate, then become wage slaves dependent on social compliance to gain access to our own money.
Other forms of currency are our best hope to delay them financial power over us, such as gold/silver, bitcoin, land, and trade. The independent and self employed have the most adaptability right now. Everyone else needs to look for alternative means to earn or trade.
MILITARY/INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
Eisenhower warned of this great threat. Kennedy tried to disable it but was murdered. All political leaders have had to give in to it in some way and conduct their wars. Why? Because wars are not only profitable, but they reduce overpopulation. They allow the power of the elites to be reshuffled when they start getting demanding, or not complying. And most of all, they gather munitions for future wars against our own people in support of Consortium objectives.
Think of every industry that profits during wars, and their lobbyists who buy and pressure politicians. Guns, munitions, chemicals, tech, uniforms, supplies, meds, hospitals, food, you name it, they are part of it. And all of them want to profit. Propaganda and lies are spread to control the narrative of the latest enemies or terrorists they want us to fight. Military used not only for defense, but expansion, control and conquest under the term "democracy" has continued in civilization after civilization. The ones in power considered themselves the "good guys", while the ones seeking to displace them, or even reject them, are marked as enemies. And so it goes, administration after administration. Because we must always have an excuse to shoot those not cooperating with Consortium profit and control objectives.
We could just stop warring. We've done it before when we demanded to leave the war in Vietnam. But then we also must quit telling other nations who to elect and who to reject. Our CIA and other spy agencies are part of the military/industrial complex, and they must be muzzled too. The people of a nation should not serve as fodder for military and corporate objectives. The police, national guard and military services are all humans, as powerless as individuals and the people they intend to support. Let us all keep that in mind and reject the manufactured conflicts spread via lies and propaganda to separate us.
CORPORATE INDUSTRIES
Jobs. They have them. We want them. We work hard to afford to live and raise families. Right now, many of them are tightening their belts to survive, meaning our jobs are not secure. They have all the power, we do not. There have been times when we've gathered against them and they have given in to us after we were outraged. Unions formed. Laws were passed demanding oversight, compliance, taxes and accountability. Workers demanded benefits, better hours and wages.
But then a war, natural disaster or calamity like a pandemic comes along and all advancements are reduced, if not eliminated. So industries get artificially propped up with bail outs, reduced compliance and tax free opportunities. Meanwhile the workers lose, and lose big. You know who doesn't lose? CEOs and investors, because most of them are the elites. How else can we have only a quarter of us working, no growth at all, and yet the stock market is soaring? Because corporate industries and investors are enjoying the trillions of dollars they received along with loan forbearance or interest free loans.
Corporations have power as long as we defer to them. You might even admit that the U S. is now a corporate oligarchy. They will pay workers as little as possible, market to consumers non-stop and keep holding out their hands for more money. They lose power when we quit buying their products and start growing or making our own supplies. Nobody needs all the stuff we've bought. And if we work for ourselves, they can't make us do anything. Keep that in mind.
RULERS
We all have them, either elected, appointed or acquired via royal birth or totalian regime. Most have clawed their way to power and don't give it up easily. Sometimes they move laterally and bide their time until they regain power. But most are bought and paid for by the billionaire elites or lobbyists or corporate sponsors. That's why they have the best healthcare, retirement packages and benefits. They may start out idealistic and hopeful, but if they've been around very long, they've joined the corruption that has grown every year. Most don't even try to pretend anymore. They blatantly and arrogantly tell you what to do or think and demand fealty of us as if we are peasants and they the Lords of the manor.
Only large group protests affect them, for they fear the mobs most of all. So gathering en mass requires a worthy cause, otherwise, the resultant crack down that eventually comes with anarchy will have made the effort ineffective. Beware the infiltrators and secret tellers who corrupt worthy causes and manipulate them to serve alternate agendas.
MEDIA, ENTERTAINMENT
Ask me no questions and I'll tell you no lies. But they do lie, exaggerate, tell half-truths, provide alternate facts, and biased ones. Most media and entertainment people are liberal in comparison to the masses they are trying to influence toward their corporate/political/elite/Consortium goals. Everything you watch on tv or movies is trying to soothe or manipulate you into accepting their point of view, which is always present. Commercials also blatantly influence to push their wares. The message is: do what we suggest if you want happiness. Don't do what we suggest if you want sadness. It's pretty simple, said in metaphor, story and song. And it is exhausting. They are making us fat, dumb, lazy and indebted consumers, and we're letting them.
PEOPLE
Workers are more valuable than non-workers. Children are more valuable than elderly, sick or unemployed. The bottom of power lies in those who receive benefits without continuing to contribute to them, regardless if you contributed in the past. There is no better way to push people off the dole than for them to die, either through sickness, starvation, pestilence or war.
As far as the Connsortium elite are concerned, children are a commodity, useful for blood/organs/sexual perversions, overwriting or future debt workers. That is what they want from us. Work hard and long hours, be too tired to fight tyranny, enjoy distractions while decisions are made that reduce your options. That is how they control, for profit and life extension. We are given busy work to do while they harvest us using grey synths that alter us and grab, then return us while we sleep. They dump contagions on us that cull the bottom level of us, considered useless, while providing new immunities in the rest of us for them to sell around the universe. It is appalling.
We do not have to remain product. Knowledge is power. RESIST!!!
submitted by garbotalk to InsurrectionEarth [link] [comments]

What A Day: Stitt Down And Shut Up by Sarah Lazarus & Crooked Media (07/15/20)

"If it’s Goya, it has to be good." - Ivanka Trump, violating federal ethics rules

Bean Here Before

With hospitals filling up and businesses shutting back down across wide swaths of the country, the Trump administration seems to have no pandemic strategy beyond sowing confusion and flogging beans.
Meanwhile, life comes at you fast.
The Trump administration condemned the country to a second surge of infections by refusing to coordinate a national response, leaving even the best state leaders to adopt piecemeal solutions by trial and error. Rather than try a different tack the second time around, Trump has committed to undermining widely trusted health experts and hiding the data that makes even those local decisions possible.

Look No Further Than The Crooked Media

Last week the Adopt a State program sent out our first Call to Action emails, and (without a hint of bias here) Florida crushed it. Team Florida has already raised upwards of $42k to support a Virtual Voter Registration Program—that will help reach 400,000 Floridians, which could cover Trump's margin of victory almost four times over.
We'll be sending each state team new calls to action every week via email, so keep checking your inbox and getting those actions done. And if you haven’t already signed up, head on over to https://votesaveamerica.com/adopt and join the thousands of volunteers looking to flip some swing states.

Under The Radar

The new head of the Postal Service has implemented major operational changes that could slow down mail delivery. Postmaster General and Trump donor Louis DeJoy instructed employees to leave mail behind at distribution centers as needed to avoid delaying mail carriers from completing their routes, a change from postal workers’ traditional mandate to not leave letters behind for the next day. DeJoy cited the agency’s need to cut costs, but the decision could chase away more customers and put the Postal Service in a deeper financial hole. It could also prove disastrous in November, when voters could lose access to mail-in ballots due to slow delivery. The Treasury Department has continued to hold a $10 billion emergency loan hostage until USPS gives in to Trump’s political agenda, and Congress has yet to provide additional funding.

What Else?

President Trump’s lawyers have renewed their efforts to block the release of his tax returns, and now plan to argue that the Manhattan district attorney’s subpoena was too broad and politically motivated. While the Supreme Court slapped down Trump’s first legal claim, it left the door open for him to keep the returns in limbo indefinitely with fake new arguments.
Trump’s also not above straight up ignoring Supreme Court decisions. The administration is still rejecting new DACA applicants, in violation of last month’s ruling.
Some of the most high-profile accounts on Twitter were compromised by bitcoin scammers. Hackers took control of the accounts of Barack Obama, Jeff Bezos, Joe Biden, Elon Musk, Apple, and many more.
The largest U.S. banks have started stockpiling billions of dollars, reflecting their assumption that the recession won’t be easing anytime soon.
Jeff Sessions lost his Alabama Senate primary runoff to Tommy Tuberville, crushed under the presidential boots he never stopped licking Trump’s former physician Dr. Ronny Jackson won his GOP primary runoff for a Texas congressional seat, and Sara Gideon won the Democratic nomination to challenge Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME). In the grander scheme, there are now at least 11 GOP congressional nominees who support QAnon and Republican leaders are quietly backing them.
Gov. Mike Parson (R-MO) said Trump will be “getting involved” in the case of the McCloskeys, the St. Louis couple who pointed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters. Trump passionately defended them on Tuesday, and, in a separate interview, downplayed police violence against Black people and defended the Confederate flag.
Ghislaine Maxwell has a secret husband, according to prosecutors at her bail hearing. Maxwell pleaded not guilty and was denied release on bail.
ViacomCBS cut ties with Nick Cannon over antisemitic comments he made on a podcast.
Kanye West’s presidential campaign to help Donald Trump win re-election has come to end, according to his advisor, though he just made it onto the ballot in Oklahoma, so as with all Kanye news, who the heck knows.
Attn PBS millennials: A Wishbone movie is in development. Our generation has been saddled with two recessions, 9/11, and the worst public health crisis in 100 years, but by god, we still have a Jack Russell Terrier who loves to read.

Be Smarter

Fatal drug overdoses are likely surging during the pandemic. Drug deaths in the U.S. reached record numbers in 2019 after falling the year before, and the pandemic may be worsening the resurgence. A report in May found overdose rates have increased by an average of 20 percent across six states in 2020, and recent drug tests have found a substantial increase in illicit drug use, as well as a geographic spread of fentanyl. Overdoses were increasing before the pandemic, but it’s definitely not helping: Social isolation puts addicts at greater risk, treatment centers have been disrupted, and people who have overdosed are more likely to avoid emergency rooms out of fear of infection.

What A Sponsor

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Is That Hope I Feel?

SHE’S OUT OF THE HOSPITAL.
Leaders in Asheville, NC, voted unanimously to provide reparations to the city’s Black residents.
Virginia has become the first state to adopt statewide emergency workplace safety standards in response to the coronavirus.
British artist Marc Quinn erected a statue of a Black Lives Matter protester in Bristol, on the plinth that used to hold a statue of slave trader Edward Colston.

Enjoy

XKCD Comics on Twitter: "COVID Risk Chart"
submitted by kittehgoesmeow to FriendsofthePod [link] [comments]

Gold standard? Federal Reserve?

Gold standard? End the Federal Reserve?
I'm pretty sure this has been debated before and asked a lot in this forum but pardon me being new here.
I am a history major and have been trying to read as much about economics as I can during my spare time. I'm about finished with Gregory Mankiw's Principles of Macroeconomics and plan to read his Principles of Microeconomics soon enough. I have also read Thomas Sowell's Basic Economics and am about halfway through reading Henry Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson. I have also recently seen Milton Friedman's Free to Choose and also plan on reading his works, as well as Friedrich Hayek and Frederick Bastiat.
One of the topics I really want to delve into is in regard to the merits of having a Federal Reserve and whether it is more beneficial to go back to a gold standard. I think that there is an economic consensus that the money supply has a great correlation with the level of inflation and the value of the dollar, as the more that is printed, the more worthless the dollar becomes, and the less printed it is, the more worth it becomes. Particularly also, fiat currency tends to be valued only in, so, far, as there is confidence in the financial systems.
For this reason, there seems to be two issues and questions at hand. The first one is if it would be more beneficial to go back to a gold standard? I understand that there are various ways in which this could occur. This could include going back to the physical use of gold as money, pegging the dollar back to gold, or begging it to some other commodity such as Bitcoin. The purpose of any of these approaches is to control the money supply by something that is finite and hence limited in nature.
This seems to solve the problem of controlling the quantity of the dollar. Some have criticized the gold standard due to the overly restricted circulation of currency that has historically led to deflationary, as opposed to inflationary periods, which could be just as devastating as inflationary periods.
The second question and problem concern the Federal Reserve. To what extent is it beneficial to have a Fed? Should the Fed be reconstructed, and or more heavily regulated? Should we outright do away with the Fed? Or should the Fed be kept the way it is? On the one hand, it makes sense in theory to have an institution such as the Fed to help regulate banks, ensuring that things such as bank runs, and or banking disasters are preventing. It also seems sensible in theory to have an institution such as the Fed, which is independent of the government, to help in coordinating monetary policy.
However, in practice, it also seems that the Fed has often been the cause of such disasters such as the Great Depression and the Great Recession by creating boom and bust cycles through arbitrarily changing interest rates, and through its various tactics at influencing monetary policy and controlling the money supply. A similar, yet different issue would be laws passed by the government encouraging risky lending such as forcing financial institutions, whether private or public to give out bad loans to risky people such as those who can't afford to take the loan.
Would it not make more sense to simply let the "invisible hand" (the forces of supply and demand) to allocate the money supply and interest rates? If there is more demand for borrowing this will push interest rates up, as banks and other financial institutions would want to charge higher interests and they would ideally want to be careful as to who they are lending money to. If there is a greater demand for saving than lending, this would push interest rates down as banks would not want to give out as much money in interest and other financial institutions would want to encourage more borrowing.
I would appreciate any resource recommendations whether they be books or other media platforms that you think do a good job at tackling any of these two issues.
submitted by Crazrwire999 to economy [link] [comments]

TIFU by falling for a scam and losing 20 thousand dollers

This happend on Tuesday June 16th 2020
I got a call saying it was Canada service calling and i was a suspect for fraud on a Federal level and i had to press 1 to get directed to a investigations officer or the police would be coming to my house to arrest me for ignoring the call.
Right off the bat the "officer" Henry Clayton badge number 969A24 from the federal police investigations department told me that i was under investigation by the federal government and wanted to know what I've been up too. They stated that i have a warrant for my arrest and that there was 7 allegations against me. Then he preceded to tell me what all the 7 allegations were. "I can't remember what he said the allegations exactly were but it sounded legit" Then he said to me do i accept these allegations as true or deny them. Of course i denied them and said i was innocent. He then asked me to provide him with the number for my local rcmp so he could contact the chief of police and have him send out someone to contact me. So i gave him the number for the local rcmp and he called them on a different line while leaving me on his line. I could hear him say his name and badge number to them and ask for the chief of police then told him the situation and asked him to get into contact with me. Then he told me that the chief will call me in a couple minutes so wait for that.
Sure enough i get a call a not even a minute later and it was the "Chief officer named bill cooper badge number 12762" he told me he received the files and wanted to confirm I was the right person he was talking too. Bill cooper said just about all the same stuff henry clayton had. Then he asked me how there was any possible way someone could have gotten my sin number to be impersonating me. I told i haven't given my sin to anyone and the only think i could think of was maybe from checking my credit score online. He said that my family and friends are under suspect as well because they would be the closest possible ones to get my sin and could have sold it off to someone or been using it themselves. He said not to mention it to them because he will have officer come to question them as well as me and wanted me to wait until then to talk with them about it. Then he says im going to transfer you over to my officer and he will guide you on what to do next.
Boom right away probably not even a minute later i get another call from "Officer Daniel Mills badge # V91D2Q13" He says that he has recieved all the info from henry clayton and bill cooper and will guide me on what to do next. He says that in the documentaion he has recieved they belive that there is a chance i could be innocent but they will have officers come to my house and do a lie dectector test and question me to make sure. Then he said for now what i should do is put my money in a safeguard because they will cancel all my bank accounts and everything that is connected with my sin number and then give me a new one and if im proven innocent and then i can transfer my money back into my accounts from the safeguard.
So "Daniel Mills" tells me i need to head to a bank right away and deposite my money into cash and then says i need to stay on the line at all times because the call is being recorded and wants to make sure im cooperating with the police. I get to the bank and then when i park my car i let him know im there. He tells me i need to follow is very specific instrctions, i need to move all my money into my checking account from my savings and my credit accounts then take all that money out in cash. I was also told i must stay on the line while i go in there. He also said i must not tell the people at the bank the real reason why im taking out this money because they are also a suspect and cannot be trusted they could be the ones who gave out my information. So I go into the bank ask the teller to move all my money including my credit card money into my checking account and take it out as cash. The teller said sure let me go aso my bank manager first and then she will be right back with me. She could obviously tell something was up because i was acting nervous. Then the bank manager comes up to me and asks me if everything is okay and if I was being told or forced to do this. I lied and told him No out of fear. Fear that he could be the one who gave out my information and fear of getting in trouble from rejecting a direct order from the officer who is still on the line. The bank teller says ok and give me my money in cash.
Then when i get back in the car i let him know i have the money. He then tells me i need to secure the money into a BiT machine and the government will refund me in the next 24/48 hours after the police come and interigate me and put me on a lie detector test to prove that im innocent. At this point i start getting very suspisious and question everything. What a fool i was to question it directly to him instead of just hanging up and thinking for a second.
He put on the pressure HARD everything i asked he would counter with agression and threats of detaining me right now for not complying with an officer of the law. I felt forced and was fearful of my own safety i have no intentions of being detained for something i didnt do. So finally i agree to go "secure my money in the BiT machine". He tells me the directions to the nearest one and to go there without hanging up the line.
I go there then he tells me he has some very specific instructions once again on what i should do. I need to go in the store and head right to the machine. Then the machine will aso for your number, out it in. Then the machine will send you a verifcation code to your texts. Put that in. Then scan the QR code i have sent you. Then put the cash into the machine and it will go into your safeguard account. And to never get off the line to stay on the line at all times. So i say ok and head in the store. The machine asked for my mobile number so i put it in. then it sent a verifcation code to my number, I open my texts see the verification code and put that in. Then i check my texts see the QR code and put that in. Then the machine says insert the money so i instert the money. All this time i was tricked into think i was putting this money in a safeguard bitcoin account for myself. But in reality i was putting it right into this guys pocket. After it was all done I tell "Daniel mills" the money is in my account. He says ok i can start heading home and the officers will get ahold of me shorty. "Click"
this was the first time in about 4 hours i wasnt on the phone with one of these "officers". I was driving for about 3 minutes thinking wait why havent the officers called me? Every other time it was so fast. Then thats when the realization had kicked in. It felt like a could of smoke over my brain had lifted and I could think clearly again. It had felt like i was brain washed by fear and anxiety into doing this persons bidding. I denied it at first thinking there is no way I talked with a bunch of officers i got their badge numbers and everything ill just wait until i get home and maybe they will call then. Nope, so i call back the number that i had been talking to this whole process and of course no answer. Then I do what I should have done from the very begining, I call the police myself. I knew I had been scammed.
TL;DR Got so full of fear and anxiety I allowed myself to get scammed into giving someone 19700$ through bitcoin.
Always trust your closest family and friends and seek advice from them no matter how bad you think the situation is.
I have the reciept from the account i put my money into and was able to trace that to the account my money got transferd too.
This is the address to the account that my money was transfered too. Looks like there is a good amount of other people who lost there money to this scam also
1Q2j7UQECVREhxmUFcHCgQVbTUxT47Bk9d
submitted by goodbyemoney123 to tifu [link] [comments]

Wall Street Breakfast: Unpredictable Jobs Day

U.S. stock indexes futures rose as much as 1% overnight as investors look ahead to two jobs reports for clarity on the economic situation. Alongside weekly unemployment claims data, the non-farm payrolls report will come a day early and will likely play a big part ahead of the Congressional debate on the next round of coronavirus stimulus. Forecasts for the jobs report are wide-ranging, but most economists predict 3M jobs were created in June, up from the 2.5M added in May (though that report was expected to show a steep loss of 8M jobs). The figures will also be backward looking, reflecting data through mid-June and not the latter part of the month when the resurgence of COVID-19 led to several shutdowns and delayed some economic reopenings.
FOMC minutes
The Fed's monetary policy-setting arm doesn't see the recovery in consumer spending being "particularly rapid beyond this year" and noted a need for "highly accommodative monetary policy for some time," according to the minutes of the June 9-10 meeting. As for the potential use of yield-curve control — yield caps or targets ("YCT"), nearly all participants had "many questions regarding the costs and benefits of such an approach." Many of the officials, though, didn't see a need for YCT as long as the FOMC's forward guidance, on its own, remains credible.
Checks? Benefits? Bonuses?
Details of the next coronavirus stimulus package are becoming a bit clearer as the House passed a bill extending the Paycheck Protection Program through August 8, sending it to President Trump's desk for his signature. Over $130B in PPP funds are still available, which could help small businesses pay overheads and keep employees on payroll. Trump also said he supports another round of direct payments to Americans – larger than what Democrats have already proposed - but is against enhanced unemployment benefits that give "a disincentive to work."
July 4th statistics
76% of Americans plan to celebrate Independence Day this year, down from 86% in 2019, as concerns run high over gathering in large groups or attending public events due to the coronavirus pandemic. Those who do have plans for the holiday are forecast to spend over $76 on average for food items - in line with historical trends - for a total of $6.52B. More than half of consumers are planning a cookout or BBQ and 28% of those celebrating expect to purchase additional patriotic items.
Next steps for Hong Kong
About 370 protesters were arrested in Hong Kong on Wednesday, including ten that were apprehended for breaching the new security law imposed by China. "We will not duck our historic responsibilities," said the U.K. in response, offering around 3M Hong Kong residents - who are eligible for BN(O) passports - a path to citizenship (Britain transferred the territory back to China in 1997). The U.S. is also looking into helping those who want to leave Hong Kong via a bipartisan bill known as the "Hong Kong Safe Harbor Act" that would grant Hong Kongers priority refugee status. Go deeper: U.S. House passes bill to sanction Chinese bank.
Big Tech on Capitol Hill
The hearing is planned for later this month and will mark the first time the chief executives of Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN), Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL), Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) and Google (GOOG, GOOGL) testified together in front of Congress. It's one of the final steps the House Judiciary Committee needs to complete an antitrust probe initiated in June 2019 and will likely produce new legislative proposals to reform and regulate the digital market. The Justice Department, Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general have also opened inquiries into the companies over markets like online advertising, online retail and smartphone apps.
Most valuable automaker
Tesla (NASDAQ:TSLA) soared 3.7% to $1,120/share on Wednesday to trade at a higher market cap than Japanese carmaker Toyota (NYSE:TM). That makes the company the most valuable automaker in the world and caps off a 10-year run that went into Ludicrous mode over the last six months. Next on the dance card is Tesla's Q2 deliveries report to be followed in a few weeks by the company's earnings report. The party doesn't stop... Shares are up another 4.4% in premarket trade to $1,170.
Latest pandemic bankruptcy
The franchisee operator was already in trouble before the coronavirus crisis, though restaurant shutdowns pushed it over the edge. NPC International, which runs more than 1,225 Pizza Hut (NYSE:YUM) and over 385 Wendy's (NASDAQ:WEN) stores nationwide, has filed for bankruptcy, but said it will continue to operate while it navigates the Chapter 11 process. The company employs nearly 40,000 people in 27 U.S. states, according to its website.
What else is happening...
Optimism builds over Pfizer, (NYSE:PFE), BioNTech's (NASDAQ:BNTX) coronavirus vaccine.
COVID-19 surge prompts McDonald's (NYSE:MCD) to halt reopening plans.
Coty (NYSE:COTY) sued over trade secrets in Kardashian-Jenner deals.
Novartis (NYSE:NVS) finalizes $678M settlement to resolve kickback claims.
American (NASDAQ:AAL) warns it's overstaffed by 8,000 flight attendants.
Nio (NYSE:NIO) posts Q2 delivery growth of 190% to 10,331 vehicles.
Wednesday's Key Earnings
Constellation Brands (NYSE:STZ) +6.3% AH as spirit sales offset a miss in beer. General Mills (NYSE:GIS) -2% declining to give specific guidance. Macy's (NYSE:M) -4.4% with sales dropping 45% in Q1.
Today's Markets
In Asia, Japan +0.1%. Hong Kong +2.9%. China +2.1%. India +1.2%. In Europe, at midday, London +0.8%. Paris +1.5%. Frankfurt +1.7%. Futures at 6:20, Dow +0.9%. S&P +0.6%. Nasdaq +0.4%. Crude +0.5% to $40.03. Gold +0.3% to $1784.40. Bitcoin +0.6% to $9213. Ten-year Treasury Yield flat at 0.68%
submitted by abiech to Winkerpack [link] [comments]

Gold standard? Federal Reserve?

I'm sorry if these two topics have already been heavily asked about in this forum. I am new to this forum and am trying to understand these issues better.
Gold standard? End the Federal Reserve?
I am a history major and have been trying to read as much about economics as I can during my spare time. I'm about finished with Gregory Mankiw's Principles of Macroeconomics and plan to read his Principles of Microeconomics soon enough. I have also read Thomas Sowell's Basic Economics and am about halfway through reading Henry Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson. I have also recently seen Milton Friedman's Free to Choose and also plan on reading his works, as well as Friedrich Hayek and Frederick Bastiat.
One of the topics I really want to delve into is in regard to the merits of having a Federal Reserve and whether it is more beneficial to go back to a gold standard. I think that there is an economic consensus that the money supply has a great correlation with the level of inflation and the value of the dollar, as the more that is printed, the more worthless the dollar becomes, and the less printed it is, the more worth it becomes. Particularly also, fiat currency tends to be valued only in, so, far, as there is confidence in the financial systems.
For this reason, there seems to be two issues and questions at hand. The first one is if it would be more beneficial to go back to a gold standard? I understand that there are various ways in which this could occur. This could include going back to the physical use of gold as money, pegging the dollar back to gold, or begging it to some other commodity such as Bitcoin. The purpose of any of these approaches is to control the money supply by something that is finite and hence limited in nature.
This seems to solve the problem of controlling the quantity of the dollar. Some have criticized the gold standard due to the overly restricted circulation of currency that has historically led to deflationary, as opposed to inflationary periods, which could be just as devastating as inflationary periods.
The second question and problem concern the Federal Reserve. To what extent is it beneficial to have a Fed? Should the Fed be reconstructed, and or more heavily regulated? Should we outright do away with the Fed? Or should the Fed be kept the way it is? On the one hand, it makes sense in theory to have an institution such as the Fed to help regulate banks, ensuring that things such as bank runs, and or banking disasters are preventing. It also seems sensible in theory to have an institution such as the Fed, which is independent of the government, to help in coordinating monetary policy.
However, in practice, it also seems that the Fed has often been the cause of such disasters such as the Great Depression and the Great Recession by creating boom and bust cycles through arbitrarily changing interest rates, and through its various tactics at influencing monetary policy and controlling the money supply. A similar, yet different issue would be laws passed by the government encouraging risky lending such as forcing financial institutions, whether private or public to give out bad loans to risky people such as those who can't afford to take the loan.
Would it not make more sense to simply let the "invisible hand" (the forces of supply and demand) to allocate the money supply and interest rates? If there is more demand for borrowing this will push interest rates up, as banks and other financial institutions would want to charge higher interests and they would ideally want to be careful as to who they are lending money to. If there is a greater demand for saving than lending, this would push interest rates down as banks would not want to give out as much money in interest and other financial institutions would want to encourage more borrowing.
I would appreciate any resource recommendations whether they be books or other media platforms that you think do a good job at tackling any of these two issues.
submitted by Crazrwire999 to AskEconomics [link] [comments]

Binance Customer Care ฿+𝟭 【𝟾𝟺𝟺】*𝟿𝟶𝟽*𝟶𝟻𝟾𝟹 ⌨ Customer Support

Binance Customer Care +𝟭 【𝟾𝟺𝟺】𝟿𝟶𝟽𝟶𝟻𝟾𝟹 Customer Support

Binance support number 1844-907-0583 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0583's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0583 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0583's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0583 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 1844-907-0583 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 1844-907-0583, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by Zealousideal_Cod3299 to u/Zealousideal_Cod3299 [link] [comments]

Binance Support Number 🎧 【+𝐼 】 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝒪𝟧𝟪𝟥☎️ Customer Service Number

Binance Support Number 🎧 【+𝐼 】 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝒪𝟧𝟪𝟥☎️ Customer Service Number

Binance support number 1844-907-0583 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0583's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0583 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0583's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0583 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 1844-907-0583 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 1844-907-0583, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by SnooPeripherals4556 to u/SnooPeripherals4556 [link] [comments]

Binance Support Number ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️ Customer Care

Binance Support Number ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️ Customer Care

Binance support number 1844-907-0583 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0583's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0583 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0583's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0583 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 1844-907-0583 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 1844-907-0583, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by Hot_Razzmatazz_9563 to u/Hot_Razzmatazz_9563 [link] [comments]

Binance Support ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️Number :Cold_Poetry_1613

Binance Support ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️Number :Cold_Poetry_1613 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0583's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0583 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0583's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0583 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 1844-907-0583 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 1844-907-0583, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by Cold_Poetry_1613 to u/Cold_Poetry_1613 [link] [comments]

Coinbase Support Number Ⓢ ⁺[𝟣𝟪𝒪𝟢] -𝟥𝟤𝟢*𝒪𝟨𝟩𝐼 Ⓢ Customer Service

Coinbase Support Number ⁺[𝟣𝟪𝒪𝟢] -𝟥𝟤𝟢*𝒪𝟨𝟩𝐼 Customer Service


Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by Appropriate-Farmer-7 to u/Appropriate-Farmer-7 [link] [comments]

Coinbase Support Number 【⁺¹】 𝟪𝟢𝟢-𝟥𝟤𝟢-𝟢𝟨𝟩𝟣 »»»» Contact Number

Coinbase Support Number 【⁺¹】 𝟪𝟢𝟢-𝟥𝟤𝟢-𝟢𝟨𝟩𝟣 »»»» Contact Number

Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Coinbase support number 1800-320-0671 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
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COVID-19 Preparedness- Conforming to Federal Guidelines & State Requirements Banking VS Cryptocurrency Why does it Matter? WILL the PAINFULLY SLOW REGULATIONS of the U.S. Lead to ... Grayscale CEO US Regulators Can’t Shut Down Bitcoin Bitcoin scares central banks. Here's why

Federal Trade Commission v. BF Labs, Inc, Federal Court, Western District of Missouri, 4:14-cv-00815-BCW 2014 (FTC file number: 142 3058) Securities and Exchange Commission v. Trendon T. Shavers and Bitcoin Saving & Trust, United States District Court, Eastern District of Texas Sherman Division, Case No. 4:13-CV-416, District Judge Mazzant (2013) Wyoming’s push is a reflection of the nation’s patchwork of state laws, created in the absence of clear federal rules. Some, like New York, favor rigorous regulation. As of the end of 2019, Congress has introduced 21 bills addressing cryptocurrency and blockchain policy that could be considered in 2020 by the second year of the 116th Congress. United States Bitcoin Regulations. On a national level, the Federal Reserve and the Internal Revenue Service have taken the following positions: Bitcoin – and all altcoins, for that matter – are not currency, but a taxable commodity akin to stocks. While individuals and businesses are free to use any private currency they wish to conduct First, let’s correct a few misconceptions surrounding the regulations of bitcoin. It’s simply not true that bitcoin and other digital currencies are not regulated. To the contrary, state and federal officials in the United States have been applying existing laws and regulations to bitcoin since it was introduced in 2009.

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COVID-19 Preparedness- Conforming to Federal Guidelines & State Requirements

Barry Silbert, CEO of cryptocurrency investment firm Grayscale Investments and Digital Currency Group, believes the United States is past the point of no return for banning Bitcoin. In a Grayscale ... COVID-19 Preparedness- Conforming to Federal Guidelines & State Requirements ... Democrat Laws Negatively Impact Minorities - Duration: ... Banking on Bitcoin YouTube Movies. 2017 · Documentary; CNBC'S Seema Mody reports on several central banks criticizing bitcoin and cryptocurrencies as unstable financial instruments. In this Crypto Potluck we dive into the banking industry how it operates the Federal Reserve and how the elites use it to destroy the American Dream. Then we talk about crytocurrency the value it ... 🔶 $10 Bitcoin SIGN UP using link above ⬆ 🔵℃elsius Wallet - Up to 10% interest on ALL crypto with LENDING - https://celsiusnetwork.app.link/19947...

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