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The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

India Online Gambling Sites

Cricket Bookies in line that accepts Indian Rupee
Public Gaming
Act of 2019 prohibits individuals of India from wagering on sporting activities wagering which has in some way disrupted business of cricket bookies in line of sporting activities betting. Nevertheless, talking about sporting activities betting, there is a percentage of charge of 100 INR, with possibly one-month imprisonment. Luckily, to resolve this problem, there are numerous lawful online betting sites for sporting activities, outside of India, that are more than satisfied to accept us as their consumers.
We would here address one thing that, till the present date, no Indian has actually ever held reliant custodianship for betting on on-line cricket bookies.
Which are favourite on the internet bookmakers in India?
The best online wagering sites for cricket in India, in addition to being prominent amongst Indians, is Betbarter.net. They were a part of the first bookies that we knew of to supply purchases of deposits and withdrawals in Indian Rupee Money (INR). This bookie has an extensive variety of sporting activities offerings like Champions organization, IPL, La Liga, EPL, football I-league, Rugby, Horse Racing, tennis, boxing as well as boundless sporting activities covering throughout the world.
Even though there are currently many other on-line sporting activities wagering sites using INR wagering accounts, many are not trustworthy. If you are searching for choices past Betbarter, we suggest adhering to sector leaders that are licensed, controlled and also have amazing notoriety. If Indian rupee isn't easily accessible as a cash option, open your account in Euro (EUR). We have consisted of much more extensive data bookmakers to take into consideration, later in this article.How can you use the best online betting in India?
On the internet gaming [1] sites having a go at a post-up property. You can simply bet making use of cash from your account equilibrium. At the point when you put down a wager, the money is subtracted from your account. If the wager wins that cash comes back to your account equilibrium as well as the benefits are added to, you can deposit/withdrawal all or part of your balance whenever you want.Every sporting activities wagering site includes various options of down payments as well as withdrawals. We recommend you to surf the cashier choice to look through the alternatives readily available as well as pick the one that you know with. Be motivated that various websites ensure to acknowledge credit rating as well as debit cards, yet not all cards for India will work. There is a high rate of the card getting declined although you have cash in your wagering account. This is the reason for setting up e-wallets is prudent
Skrill operating in India?
Those who are serious about on-line wagering may want to have different e-wallets. The following I suggest establishing is www.skrill.com which has lower charges. Validating a Skrill account from India can be a moderate issue, so you require to get in the registration details very meticulously. The exciting news is as soon as you receive the verification treatment (often takes multi-week or a lot more) you'll be established to relocate money to any kind of sporting activities wagering website effortlessly.
Neteller in India
www.neteller.com is another popular e-wallet that can be made use of in India. Neteller is essentially a UK company licensed by federal government FSA (Financial Service Authority) to function as a web savings account. This e-wallet gives an option to open an account in lots of money, consisting of INR.
Practically every online betting site offers NETELLER in their staff as both a deposit and also to withdrawal. You can use this comparable to your financial institution account.Getting squander of NETELLER is straightforward. They supply financial institution action withdrawals to any type of bank on the world and have various alternatives accessible also. The challenge is a lot more on the best means to include cash money to NETELLER originally. For this, you may need to use something like bitcoin to store. You can discover this in the funding section of your NETELLER [2] account. Bitcoins can be acquired making use of IMPS Financial institution Transfer from private venders advertising on Neighborhood Bitcoins. That site goes about as an escrow making it a safe technique to buy bitcoin online from India.
Various other sites to consider for sports betting
Betfair.com-It is the globe's largest wagering exchange as well as easy to use for Indians, as well as you can become familiar with the Betfair reviews. They supply to bet on Indian Premier Organization and also a wide variety of sporting activities from all over throughout the world. The main absent component here is I-league football betting.
188Bet.com-This internet site supplies online banking on football matches. This is a remarkable Oriental Bookmaker for Indians. They give the alternative of live betting on all the significant football competitions from all over the world, consisting of EPL and on leagues less well-known around the world, as an example, I-association, Chinese Super Organization, and so forth. They are, we would see it not the most effective for cricket.
submitted by BetBarter to u/BetBarter [link] [comments]

Quant Network Partner with the largest Financial Network Provider in Europe, SIA, bringing Overledger to SIA's 570 Banks and Trading venues as clients. Quant Network are also working with the Central Bank of Italy for settlements

Quant Network recently attended Money 20/20 in Europe where they announced a partnership with SIA.
https://www.sia.eu/en/media-events/news-press-releases/sia-partners-with-quant-network-to-explore-innovative-solutions-in-blockchain-interoperability-for-banks-and-financial

So what we’ve done is instead of just announcing one client and one thing, we’re announcing that we’re working with SIA. So, SIA is leading European payment infrastructure. And what we’re doing with SIA is interconnecting blockchain networks with SIA, and doing settlements, which are central bank settlements, with the central bank in Italy. So what Overledger is doing is we’re actually bringing blockchain and interoperability to all of SIA’s clients, which are 580 banks. So, Overledger could be rolled out to all these institutions, financial services, banks, at scale, and have interoperability to get the benefits of this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cNmGrLPoTo&t=7s

Just to make it clear this isn't SIACoin, this is SIA, the largest financial Network provider in Europe. some more info about SIA below:
The Eurosystem (compromises of the European Central Bank (ECB) and 19 National Central banks that are using the Euro such as the central banks of Italy, Germany, France, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland etc.) operates the financial market infrastructure for the settlement of payments (TARGET2), TARGET Instant Payment Settlement (TIPS) and securities (TARGET2-Securities, or T2S). These platforms form the backbone of the European financial market.
All of these platforms will be reachable via the Eurosystem Single Market Infrastructure Gateway (ESMIG). The single connectivity gateway to all Target services would provide a simpler and more efficient means to access the key market infrastructures and up to 3 Network Service Providers will be able chosen. The two companies currently going through the approval process are SIA (who were the first to be gain Eurosystem certification for TIPS) and SWIFT.

Other Partners and Announcements:


"Although Crowdz uses the Ethereum blockchain as the foundation for our Invoice Auction Exchange, we have needed a solution that allows for invoices and other documents to be transferred from one blockchain to another — for example, among Hyperledger, Corda, and EOS. With the Overledger solution from Quant Network, it is now possible to pass data among different blockchains. Crowdz looks forward to working with Quant Network to enable the true multi-blockchain environment that our customers demand.” - Payson Johnston, President and CEO of Crowdz

Team:

Incredible team with loads of experience - Gilbert CEO was the Chief Information Security Officer at Vocalink (Mastercard) Gilbert was in charge of Security for the Faster Payments service in the UK which deals with £6 Trillion every year. Previous roles at HSBC, PWC, HSBC, EY, UK Government, HM Treasury and Bank of England.
The most recent addition is the new COO, Cecilia Harvey, who joined from her previous role as Director at HSBC Global Banking and Markets. Cecilia is a Tech Women 100 Winner and also worked at Vocalink, Citi, Barclays, Accenture, IBM and Morgan Stanley
Lots of other experience in the team working for companies such as BT, Nationwide, NHS, Deutsche Bank, KPMG, HMRC, National Crime Agency and Europol
https://www.linkedin.com/search/results/people/?facetCurrentCompany=%5B%2211169903%22%5D

Token Utility

From our original thinking in the whitepaper and business paper, the purpose of QNT has always been multi-purpose. The 1st phase of QNT was to help create an ecosystem of developers and enterprise. The 2nd phase, QNT has been used to verify and the option to sign and encrypt every single transaction that flows through Overledger for security purposes. The 3rd phase of QNT is something we've been working on. It's to be used for the movement of Digital Assets across chains. QNT is a Universal Utility Token, providing access to the Overledger ecosystem and also to be used to pay for transactions and usage across chains. We're also going to enforce mimimum wallet holdings for all participants.This is a market need we're seeing with clients and a tokenised ecosystem is the future we're all working towards. This is something we can do now, where others have been trying to achieve for the last couple of years.We have clients we're working with in financial services that are moving digital assets internally within a permissioned network and want to be able to interoperate with other parties to recognise their digital asset on different internal permissioned chains. Plus they also want to be able to move and settle on public permissionless blockchains safely and securely - Overledger is the only technology that can do this today.
This is a game changer we've been working on. We're bringing blockchain interoperability to the 570 banks that SIA work with.We want users with volume - if we're powering the digital asset economy with QNT this is a game changer in this space. This is what Ripple with XRP, Stellar with XLM and partnering with IBM have been trying to do - Gilbert from Telegram
https://www.quant.network/QUANT_Token_Utility_V0.2.pdf
Quant have released the Quant Enterprise Treasury which allows Enterprises to pay for license fees in FIAT and the treasury automatically converts them into QNT. The treasury gets the tokens from Exchanges / OTC.
QNT has a total supply which is 1/3 less than Bitcoin's total supply at only 14.6 million QNT. Unlike Bitcoin currently you don't have to wait till 2140 for all of the tokens to be in circulation. All QNT is in circulation, there is no inflation and no new tokens will be minted.
Unlike with Ripple where the majority of partnered banks don't actually use XRP, all banks that use Overledger will use QNT. Ripple is valued at $17.7 Billion and 42 Billion XRP are in circulation. There is another 58 Billion XRP which is due to come into circulation via inflation. (If you take that into account at todays prices that's a total market cap of $42 Billion
The other thing to consider is that whilst they may not be popular on here, permissioned blockchains are going to far more widely used over the next couple of years than public blockchains for Enterprises. This is because public blockchains currently lack many features - speed, privacy, as well as regulation involved with being decentralised etc. Thats not to say it won't shift towards public blockchains in the future but not in the next couple of years. (Just have to look at the number of permissioned blockchains being used in Forbes recent blockchain 50 list to see this. Whilst permissioned blockchains don't need Gas and so don't have their own token. Even if enterprises are only using permissioned blockchains to interoperabte between them, they will need QNT.
QNT with all of its token in circulation, no inflation, better tokenomics than many, wide usage in short and long term connecting to permissioned and public blockchains as well as sitll on the 2nd page on Coinmarket cap and hasn't listed on a "Tier 1" exchange yet.

Other:


Would you like to connect your favourite blockchain to Overledger so that you have access to all of these enterprises / developers / clients to use? Well you can and unlike with exchange listings its completely free and open source. Once you have created the connector send it in for approval to connect to Overledger. Join the Quant Network Developer portal to find out more

for a more in depth look at Quant Network please see the following articles:
Part One — Blockchain Fundamentals
Part Two — The Layers Of Overledger
Part Three — TrustTag and the Tokenisation of data
Part Four — Features Overledger provides to MAPPs
Part Five — Creating the Standards for Interoperability
Part Six — The Team behind Overledger and Partners
Part Seven — The QNT Token
Part Eight — Enabling Enterprise Mass Adoption
Quant Network enabling mass adoption of blockchain at a rapid pace
submitted by xSeq22x to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Can anybody name another blockchain company that has achieved more in the last 2 months? (and still near the bottom on page 2 on CMC)

It’s been an incredible couple of months for Quant Network with lots of exciting news coming out, the company is growing fast, expanding to the US and taking on new clients at a rapid pace and enabling enterprise mass adoption of blockchain.
Leave a comment if there are any others that have achieved similar levels in the last 2 months
For more details about the points above please see the following article
https://medium.com/@CryptoSeq/quant-network-enabling-mass-adoption-of-blockchain-at-a-rapid-pace-60a8f08e95b0
For an indepth look at Quant Network please see the following posts:
Part One — Blockchain Fundamentals
Part Two — The Layers Of Overledger
Part Three — TrustTag and the Tokenisation of data
Part Four — Features Overledger provides to MAPPs
Part Five — Creating the Standards for Interoperability
Part Six — The Team behind Overledger and Partners
Part Seven — The QNT Token
Part Eight — Enabling Enterprise Mass Adoption
submitted by xSeq22x to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Quant Network — Enabling Mass Adoption of Blockchain at a Rapid Pace

It’s been an incredible couple of months for Quant Network with lots of exciting news coming out, the company is growing fast, expanding to the US and taking on new clients at a rapid pace and enabling enterprise mass adoption of blockchain.
For more details about the points above please see the following article
https://medium.com/@CryptoSeq/quant-network-enabling-mass-adoption-of-blockchain-at-a-rapid-pace-60a8f08e95b0
For an indepth look at Quant Network please see the following posts:
Part One — Blockchain Fundamentals
Part Two — The Layers Of Overledger
Part Three — TrustTag and the Tokenisation of data
Part Four — Features Overledger provides to MAPPs
Part Five — Creating the Standards for Interoperability
Part Six — The Team behind Overledger and Partners
Part Seven — The QNT Token
Part Eight — Enabling Enterprise Mass Adoption
submitted by xSeq22x to QuantNetwork [link] [comments]

With Quant Network's Overledger you can connect your favourite blockchain to potentially 570 banks and lots of developers for FREE using the open source connectors. Spend 5 minutes learning about one of the most undervalued projects there is.

Whilst i'm sure there will be the usual tribalism comments, hopefully those that are able to put their feelings to one side and just spend 5 minutes reading the below, giving an overview of a project that is enhancing blockchain adoption by enterprises - which leads to more funding being put into blockchain, which leads to more developers and ultimately mass adoption.
Quant Network's Overledger is a Blockchain Operating system that currently connects 10 blockchains to provide interoperability as well as connect to networks offchain / oracle services. Below is a more info on their recent big announcement with the largest financial network provider in Europe - SIA as well as other announcements, the team and the token.
Partners and Announcements:
Quant Network recently attended Money 20/20 in Europe where they announced a partnership with SIA.
https://www.sia.eu/en/media-events/news-press-releases/sia-partners-with-quant-network-to-explore-innovative-solutions-in-blockchain-interoperability-for-banks-and-financial
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cNmGrLPoTo&t=7s
So what we’ve done is instead of just announcing one client and one thing, we’re announcing that we’re working with SIA. So, SIA is leading European payment infrastructure. And what we’re doing with SIA is interconnecting blockchain networks with SIA, and doing settlements, which are central bank settlements, with the central bank in Italy. So what Overledger is doing is we’re actually bringing blockchain and interoperability to all of SIA’s clients, which are 580 banks. So, Overledger could be rolled out to all these institutions, financial services, banks, at scale, and have interoperability to get the benefits of this.
Just to make it clear this isn't SIACoin, this is SIA, the largest financial Network provider in Europe. some more info about SIA below:
The Eurosystem (compromises of the European Central Bank (ECB) and 19 National Central banks that are using the Euro such as the central banks of Italy, Germany, France, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland etc.) operates the financial market infrastructure for the settlement of payments (TARGET2), TARGET Instant Payment Settlement (TIPS) and securities (TARGET2-Securities, or T2S). These platforms form the backbone of the European financial market.
All of these platforms will be reachable via the Eurosystem Single Market Infrastructure Gateway (ESMIG). The single connectivity gateway to all Target services would provide a simpler and more efficient means to access the key market infrastructures and up to 3 Network Service Providers will be able chosen. The two companies currently going through the approval process are SIA (who were the first to be gain Eurosystem certification for TIPS) and SWIFT.
"Although Crowdz uses the Ethereum blockchain as the foundation for our Invoice Auction Exchange, we have needed a solution that allows for invoices and other documents to be transferred from one blockchain to another — for example, among Hyperledger, Corda, and EOS. With the Overledger solution from Quant Network, it is now possible to pass data among different blockchains. Crowdz looks forward to working with Quant Network to enable the true multi-blockchain environment that our customers demand.” - Payson Johnston, President and CEO of Crowdz
Team:
Incredible team with loads of experience - Gilbert CEO was the Chief Information Security Officer at Vocalink (Mastercard) Gilbert was in charge of Security for the Faster Payments service in the UK which deals with £6 Trillion every year. Previous roles at HSBC, PWC, HSBC, EY, UK Government, HM Treasury and Bank of England.
The most recent addition is the new COO, Cecilia Harvey, who joined from her previous role as Director at HSBC Global Banking and Markets. Cecilia is a Tech Women 100 Winner and also worked at Vocalink, Citi, Barclays, Accenture, IBM and Morgan Stanley
Lots of other experience in the team working for companies such as BT, Nationwide, NHS, Deutsche Bank, KPMG, HMRC, National Crime Agency and Europol
https://www.linkedin.com/search/results/people/?facetCurrentCompany=%5B%2211169903%22%5D
Token Utility
From our original thinking in the whitepaper and business paper, the purpose of QNT has always been multi-purpose. The 1st phase of QNT was to help create an ecosystem of developers and enterprise. The 2nd phase, QNT has been used to verify and the option to sign and encrypt every single transaction that flows through Overledger for security purposes. The 3rd phase of QNT is something we've been working on. It's to be used for the movement of Digital Assets across chains. QNT is a Universal Utility Token, providing access to the Overledger ecosystem and also to be used to pay for transactions and usage across chains. We're also going to enforce mimimum wallet holdings for all participants. This is a market need we're seeing with clients and a tokenised ecosystem is the future we're all working towards. This is something we can do now, where others have been trying to achieve for the last couple of years. We have clients we're working with in financial services that are moving digital assets internally within a permissioned network and want to be able to interoperate with other parties to recognise their digital asset on different internal permissioned chains. Plus they also want to be able to move and settle on public permissionless blockchains safely and securely - Overledger is the only technology that can do this today.
This is a game changer we've been working on. We're bringing blockchain interoperability to the 570 banks that SIA work with. We want users with volume - if we're powering the digital asset economy with QNT this is a game changer in this space. This is what Ripple with XRP, Stellar with XLM and partnering with IBM have been trying to do - Gilbert from Telegram
https://www.quant.network/QUANT_Token_Utility_V0.2.pdf
QNT is used to validate with the option to sign and encrypt every transaction that flows through Overledger. No Transactions can
No 3rd Party can view or tamper with transactions and their contents, including Quant when signed and encrypted
Enterprises and community developers need to purchase an annual license to develop apps on the platform
Consumption fees such as read / write to overledger are paid in QNT
Moving of digital assets across chains whether permissioned or permissionless will require QNT
The license fees are based on a fixed FIAT Value and the equivilant number of QNT are purchased and taken out of circulation for 12 months.
Once the license is renewed after 12 months the tokens remain locked out of circulation
Users will need to hold a minimum amount of QNT to use Overledger.
Quant have released the Quant Enterprise Treasury which allows Enterprises to pay for license fees in FIAT and the treasury automatically converts them into QNT. The treasury gets the tokens from Exchanges / OTC.
QNT has a total supply which is 1/3 less than Bitcoin's total supply at only 14.6 million QNT. Unlike Bitcoin currently you don't have to wait till 2140 for all of the tokens to be in circulation. All QNT is in circulation, there is no inflation and no new tokens will be minted.
Unlike with Ripple where the majority of partnered banks don't actually use XRP, all banks that use Overledger will use QNT. Ripple is valued at $17.7 Billion and 42 Billion XRP are in circulation. There is another 58 Billion XRP which is due to come into circulation via inflation. (If you take that into account at todays prices that's a total market cap of $42 Billion
ATOM (The token for the Cosmos Hub) is only used for staking and transactions for the Cosmos hub and not the entire Cosmos ecosystem. There will be many hubs each with their own token. Cosmos interoperability protocol IBC is still in reasearch phase and can't connect the hub to zones within the cosmos ecosystem). Also to encourage staking it is designed to be hyperinflationary by having a yearly inflation of between 7 and 20%. This makes ATOM a depreciating asset and to combat this you need to stake your ATOM (which you receive more ATOM as a reward for the loss of value per token). Another way to look at it is if the Market cap stayed the same at £1 Billion over 10 years the value of each ATOM would drop from £4.23 to £0.68 (-83.92%).
The other thing to consider is that whilst they may not be popular on here, permissioned blockchains are going to far more widely used over the next couple of years than public blockchains for Enterprises. This is because public blockchains currently lack many features - speed, privacy, as well as regulation involved with being decentralised etc. Thats not to say it won't shift towards public blockchains in the future but not in the next couple of years. (Just have to look at the number of permissioned blockchains being used in Forbes recent blockchain 50 list to see this. Whilst permissioned blockchains don't need Gas and so don't have their own token. Even if enterprises are only using permissioned blockchains to interoperabte between them, they will need QNT.
QNT with all of its token in circulation, no inflation, better tokenomics than many, wide usage in short and long term connecting to permissioned and public blockchains as well as sitll on the 2nd page on Coinmarket cap and hasn't listed on a "Tier 1" exchange yet.
Other:
Would you like to connect your favourite blockchain to Overledger so that you have access to all of these enterprises / developers / clients to use? Well you can and unlike with exchange listings its completely free and open source. Once you have created the connector send it in for approval to connect to Overledger. Join the Quant Network Developer portal to find out more, submit
for a more in depth look at Quant Network please see the following articles:
Part One — Blockchain Fundamentals
Part Two — The Layers Of Overledger
Part Three — TrustTag and the Tokenisation of data
Part Four — Features Overledger provides to MAPPs
Part Five — Creating the Standards for Interoperability
Part Six — The Team behind Overledger and Partners
Part Seven — The QNT Token
Part Eight — Enabling Enterprise Mass Adoption
Quant Network enabling mass adoption of blockchain at a rapid pace
submitted by xSeq22x to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

Quant Network Partner with the largest Financial Network Provider in Europe, SIA, bringing Overledger to SIA's 570 Banks and Trading venues as clients. Quant Network are also working with the Central Bank of Italy for settlements

Quant Network recently attended Money 20/20 in Europe where they announced a partnership with SIA.
https://www.sia.eu/en/media-events/news-press-releases/sia-partners-with-quant-network-to-explore-innovative-solutions-in-blockchain-interoperability-for-banks-and-financial
So what we’ve done is instead of just announcing one client and one thing, we’re announcing that we’re working with SIA. So, SIA is leading European payment infrastructure. And what we’re doing with SIA is interconnecting blockchain networks with SIA, and doing settlements, which are central bank settlements, with the central bank in Italy. So what Overledger is doing is we’re actually bringing blockchain and interoperability to all of SIA’s clients, which are 580 banks. So, Overledger could be rolled out to all these institutions, financial services, banks, at scale, and have interoperability to get the benefits of this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cNmGrLPoTo&t=7s

Just to make it clear this isn't SIACoin, this is SIA, the largest financial Network provider in Europe. some more info about SIA below:

The Eurosystem (compromises of the European Central Bank (ECB) and 19 National Central banks that are using the Euro such as the central banks of Italy, Germany, France, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland etc.) operates the financial market infrastructure for the settlement of payments (TARGET2), TARGET Instant Payment Settlement (TIPS) and securities (TARGET2-Securities, or T2S). These platforms form the backbone of the European financial market.
All of these platforms will be reachable via the Eurosystem Single Market Infrastructure Gateway (ESMIG). The single connectivity gateway to all Target services would provide a simpler and more efficient means to access the key market infrastructures and up to 3 Network Service Providers will be able chosen. The two companies currently going through the approval process are SIA (who were the first to be gain Eurosystem certification for TIPS) and SWIFT.

Other Partners and Announcements:

"Although Crowdz uses the Ethereum blockchain as the foundation for our Invoice Auction Exchange, we have needed a solution that allows for invoices and other documents to be transferred from one blockchain to another — for example, among Hyperledger, Corda, and EOS. With the Overledger solution from Quant Network, it is now possible to pass data among different blockchains. Crowdz looks forward to working with Quant Network to enable the true multi-blockchain environment that our customers demand.” - Payson Johnston, President and CEO of Crowdz

Team:

Incredible team with loads of experience - Gilbert CEO was the Chief Information Security Officer at Vocalink (Mastercard) Gilbert was in charge of Security for the Faster Payments service in the UK which deals with £6 Trillion every year. Previous roles at HSBC, PWC, HSBC, EY, UK Government, HM Treasury and Bank of England.
The most recent addition is the new COO, Cecilia Harvey, who joined from her previous role as Director at HSBC Global Banking and Markets. Cecilia is a Tech Women 100 Winner and also worked at Vocalink, Citi, Barclays, Accenture, IBM and Morgan Stanley
Lots of other experience in the team working for companies such as BT, Nationwide, NHS, Deutsche Bank, KPMG, HMRC, National Crime Agency and Europol
https://www.linkedin.com/search/results/people/?facetCurrentCompany=%5B%2211169903%22%5D

Token Utility

From our original thinking in the whitepaper and business paper, the purpose of QNT has always been multi-purpose. The 1st phase of QNT was to help create an ecosystem of developers and enterprise. The 2nd phase, QNT has been used to verify and the option to sign and encrypt every single transaction that flows through Overledger for security purposes. The 3rd phase of QNT is something we've been working on. It's to be used for the movement of Digital Assets across chains. QNT is a Universal Utility Token, providing access to the Overledger ecosystem and also to be used to pay for transactions and usage across chains. We're also going to enforce mimimum wallet holdings for all participants. This is a market need we're seeing with clients and a tokenised ecosystem is the future we're all working towards. This is something we can do now, where others have been trying to achieve for the last couple of years. We have clients we're working with in financial services that are moving digital assets internally within a permissioned network and want to be able to interoperate with other parties to recognise their digital asset on different internal permissioned chains. Plus they also want to be able to move and settle on public permissionless blockchains safely and securely - Overledger is the only technology that can do this today. This is a game changer we've been working on. We're bringing blockchain interoperability to the 570 banks that SIA work with. We want users with volume - if we're powering the digital asset economy with QNT this is a game changer in this space. This is what Ripple with XRP, Stellar with XLM and partnering with IBM have been trying to do - Gilbert from Telegram
https://www.quant.network/QUANT_Token_Utility_V0.2.pdf
Quant have released the Quant Enterprise Treasury which allows Enterprises to pay for license fees in FIAT and the treasury automatically converts them into QNT. The treasury gets the tokens from Exchanges / OTC.
QNT has a total supply which is 1/3 less than Bitcoin's total supply at only 14.6 million QNT. Unlike Bitcoin currently you don't have to wait till 2140 for all of the tokens to be in circulation. All QNT is in circulation, there is no inflation and no new tokens will be minted.
Unlike with Ripple where the majority of partnered banks don't actually use XRP, all banks that use Overledger will use QNT. Ripple is valued at $17.7 Billion and 42 Billion XRP are in circulation. There is another 58 Billion XRP which is due to come into circulation via inflation. (If you take that into account at todays prices that's a total market cap of $42 Billion
ATOM (The token for the Cosmos Hub) is only used for staking and transactions for the Cosmos hub and not the entire Cosmos ecosystem. There will be many hubs each with their own token. Cosmos interoperability protocol IBC is still in reasearch phase and can't connect the hub to zones within the cosmos ecosystem). Also to encourage staking it is designed to be hyperinflationary by having a yearly inflation of between 7 and 20%. This makes ATOM a depreciating asset and to combat this you need to stake your ATOM (which you receive more ATOM as a reward for the loss of value per token). Another way to look at it is if the Market cap stayed the same at £1 Billion over 10 years the value of each ATOM would drop from £4.23 to £0.68 (-83.92%).
The other thing to consider is that whilst they may not be popular on here, permissioned blockchains are going to far more widely used over the next couple of years than public blockchains for Enterprises. This is because public blockchains currently lack many features - speed, privacy, as well as regulation involved with being decentralised etc. Thats not to say it won't shift towards public blockchains in the future but not in the next couple of years. (Just have to look at the number of permissioned blockchains being used in Forbes recent blockchain 50 list to see this. Whilst permissioned blockchains don't need Gas and so don't have their own token. Even if enterprises are only using permissioned blockchains to interoperabte between them, they will need QNT.

QNT with all of its token in circulation, no inflation, better tokenomics than many, wide usage in short and long term connecting to permissioned and public blockchains as well as sitll on the 2nd page on Coinmarket cap and hasn't listed on a "Tier 1" exchange yet.

Other:


Would you like to connect your favourite blockchain to Overledger so that you have access to all of these enterprises / developers / clients to use? Well you can and unlike with exchange listings its completely free and open source. Once you have created the connector send it in for approval to connect to Overledger. Join the Quant Network Developer portal to find out more, submit

for a more in depth look at Quant Network please see the following articles:
Part One — Blockchain Fundamentals
Part Two — The Layers Of Overledger
Part Three — TrustTag and the Tokenisation of data
Part Four — Features Overledger provides to MAPPs
Part Five — Creating the Standards for Interoperability
Part Six — The Team behind Overledger and Partners
Part Seven — The QNT Token
Part Eight — Enabling Enterprise Mass Adoption
Quant Network enabling mass adoption of blockchain at a rapid pace
submitted by xSeq22x to QuantNetwork [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

Quant Network Partner with the largest Financial Network Provider in Europe, SIA, bringing Overledger to SIA's 570 Banks and Trading venues as clients to use Corda and Ethereum. Quant Network are also working with the Central Bank of Italy for settlements

Quant Network recently attended Money 20/20 in Europe where they announced a partnership with SIA.
https://www.sia.eu/en/media-events/news-press-releases/sia-partners-with-quant-network-to-explore-innovative-solutions-in-blockchain-interoperability-for-banks-and-financial

The first interoperability tests will be executed on R3’s Corda and private Ethereum platforms.
So what we’ve done is instead of just announcing one client and one thing, we’re announcing that we’re working with SIA. So, SIA is leading European payment infrastructure. And what we’re doing with SIA is interconnecting blockchain networks with SIA, and doing settlements, which are central bank settlements, with the central bank in Italy. So what Overledger is doing is we’re actually bringing blockchain and interoperability to all of SIA’s clients, which are 580 banks. So, Overledger could be rolled out to all these institutions, financial services, banks, at scale, and have interoperability to get the benefits of this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cNmGrLPoTo&t=7s
Just to make it clear this isn't SIACoin, this is SIA, the largest financial Network provider in Europe. some more info about SIA below:
The Eurosystem (compromises of the European Central Bank (ECB) and 19 National Central banks that are using the Euro such as the central banks of Italy, Germany, France, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland etc.) operates the financial market infrastructure for the settlement of payments (TARGET2), TARGET Instant Payment Settlement (TIPS) and securities (TARGET2-Securities, or T2S). These platforms form the backbone of the European financial market.
All of these platforms will be reachable via the Eurosystem Single Market Infrastructure Gateway (ESMIG). The single connectivity gateway to all Target services would provide a simpler and more efficient means to access the key market infrastructures and up to 3 Network Service Providers will be able chosen. The two companies currently going through the approval process are SIA (who were the first to be gain Eurosystem certification for TIPS) and SWIFT.

Other Partners and Announcements:

"Although Crowdz uses the Ethereum blockchain as the foundation for our Invoice Auction Exchange, we have needed a solution that allows for invoices and other documents to be transferred from one blockchain to another — for example, among Hyperledger, Corda, and EOS. With the Overledger solution from Quant Network, it is now possible to pass data among different blockchains. Crowdz looks forward to working with Quant Network to enable the true multi-blockchain environment that our customers demand.” - Payson Johnston, President and CEO of Crowdz

Team:

Incredible team with loads of experience - Gilbert CEO was the Chief Information Security Officer at Vocalink (Mastercard) Gilbert was in charge of Security for the Faster Payments service in the UK which deals with £6 Trillion every year. Previous roles at HSBC, PWC, HSBC, EY, UK Government, HM Treasury and Bank of England.
The most recent addition is the new COO, Cecilia Harvey, who joined from her previous role as Director at HSBC Global Banking and Markets. Cecilia is a Tech Women 100 Winner and also worked at Vocalink, Citi, Barclays, Accenture, IBM and Morgan Stanley
Lots of other experience in the team working for companies such as BT, Nationwide, NHS, Deutsche Bank, KPMG, HMRC, National Crime Agency and Europol
https://www.linkedin.com/search/results/people/?facetCurrentCompany=%5B%2211169903%22%5D

Token Utility

From our original thinking in the whitepaper and business paper, the purpose of QNT has always been multi-purpose. The 1st phase of QNT was to help create an ecosystem of developers and enterprise. The 2nd phase, QNT has been used to verify and the option to sign and encrypt every single transaction that flows through Overledger for security purposes. The 3rd phase of QNT is something we've been working on. It's to be used for the movement of Digital Assets across chains. QNT is a Universal Utility Token, providing access to the Overledger ecosystem and also to be used to pay for transactions and usage across chains. We're also going to enforce mimimum wallet holdings for all participants. This is a market need we're seeing with clients and a tokenised ecosystem is the future we're all working towards. This is something we can do now, where others have been trying to achieve for the last couple of years. We have clients we're working with in financial services that are moving digital assets internally within a permissioned network and want to be able to interoperate with other parties to recognise their digital asset on different internal permissioned chains. Plus they also want to be able to move and settle on public permissionless blockchains safely and securely - Overledger is the only technology that can do this today. This is a game changer we've been working on. We're bringing blockchain interoperability to the 570 banks that SIA work with. We want users with volume - if we're powering the digital asset economy with QNT this is a game changer in this space. This is what Ripple with XRP, Stellar with XLM and partnering with IBM have been trying to do - Gilbert from Telegram
https://www.quant.network/QUANT_Token_Utility_V0.2.pdf
QNT is used to validate with the option to sign and encrypt every transaction that flows through Overledger. No Transactions can
No 3rd Party can view or tamper with transactions and their contents, including Quant when signed and encrypted
Enterprises and community developers need to purchase an annual license to develop apps on the platform
Consumption fees such as read / write to overledger are paid in QNT
Moving of digital assets across chains whether permissioned or permissionless will require QNT
The license fees are based on a fixed FIAT Value and the equivilant number of QNT are purchased and taken out of circulation for 12 months.
Once the license is renewed after 12 months the tokens remain locked out of circulation
Users will need to hold a minimum amount of QNT to use Overledger.
Quant have released the Quant Enterprise Treasury which allows Enterprises to pay for license fees in FIAT and the treasury automatically converts them into QNT. The treasury gets the tokens from Exchanges / OTC.
QNT has a total supply which is 1/3 less than Bitcoin's total supply at only 14.6 million QNT. Unlike Bitcoin currently you don't have to wait till 2140 for all of the tokens to be in circulation. All QNT is in circulation, there is no inflation and no new tokens will be minted.
Unlike with Ripple where the majority of partnered banks don't actually use XRP, all banks that use Overledger will use QNT. Ripple is valued at $17.7 Billion and 42 Billion XRP are in circulation. There is another 58 Billion XRP which is due to come into circulation via inflation. (If you take that into account at todays prices that's a total market cap of $42 Billion
The other thing to consider is that whilst they may not be popular on here, permissioned blockchains are going to far more widely used over the next couple of years than public blockchains for Enterprises. This is because public blockchains currently lack many features - speed, privacy, as well as regulation involved with being decentralised etc. Thats not to say it won't shift towards public blockchains in the future but not in the next couple of years. (Just have to look at the number of permissioned blockchains being used in Forbes recent blockchain 50 list to see this. Whilst permissioned blockchains don't need Gas and so don't have their own token. Even if enterprises are only using permissioned blockchains to interoperabte between them, they will need QNT.
QNT with all of its token in circulation, no inflation, better tokenomics than many, wide usage in short and long term connecting to permissioned and public blockchains as well as still on the 2nd page on Coinmarket cap and hasn't listed on a "Tier 1" exchange yet.

Other:


Would you like to connect your favourite blockchain to Overledger so that you have access to all of these enterprises / developers / clients to use? Well you can and unlike with exchange listings its completely free and open source. Once you have created the connector send it in for approval to connect to Overledger. Join the Quant Network Developer portal to find out more, submit

for a more in depth look at Quant Network please see the following articles:
Part One — Blockchain Fundamentals
Part Two — The Layers Of Overledger
Part Three — TrustTag and the Tokenisation of data
Part Four — Features Overledger provides to MAPPs
Part Five — Creating the Standards for Interoperability
Part Six — The Team behind Overledger and Partners
Part Seven — The QNT Token
Part Eight — Enabling Enterprise Mass Adoption
Quant Network enabling mass adoption of blockchain at a rapid pace
submitted by xSeq22x to ethereum [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to btc [link] [comments]

TSA How to buy Bitcoin in the UK (5 Easy Steps with NO Fees!) - Bitcoin for Beginners How To Buy Bitcoin In UK How to buy Bitcoin for Beginners How To Buy or Sell Bitcoin in UK Easy!

The UK’s daily broadsheet, the Telegraph, has reported that the Conservative government is still dragging its heels regarding the regulation of cryptocurrency, despite London becoming one of Europe’s main crypto hubs and the home to some of the industries biggest players. No investor protection: You are extremely unlikely to have access to UK regulatory protections like the Financial Services Compensation Scheme or the Financial Ombudsman Service. Price volatility : Like cryptocurrencies in general, the value of a token may be extremely volatile – vulnerable to dramatic changes. Coinbase is a secure platform that makes it easy to buy, sell, and store cryptocurrency like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and more. Based in the USA, Coinbase is available in over 30 countries worldwide. List of Top regulated forex brokers that accept bitcoin for deposits or withdrawal and best trusted company that offer bitcoin vs dollar (BTC/USD) trading FCA UK, NFA, CFTC, ASIC, IIROC, FSA UK financial watchdog spells out risk for those participating in initial coin offerings using cryptocurrencies Patrick Collinson Tue 12 Sep 2017 09.48 EDT First published on Tue 12 Sep 2017 09.28 EDT

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TSA "saw" Bitcoin in my bag and wanted to count it.

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